Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cognitive control of involuntary distraction by deviant sounds.
J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2013 Sep; 39(5):1635-41.JE

Abstract

It is well established that a task-irrelevant sound (deviant sound) departing from an otherwise repetitive sequence of sounds (standard sounds) elicits an involuntary capture of attention and orienting response toward the deviant stimulus, resulting in the lengthening of response times in an ongoing task. Some have argued that this type of distraction can be reduced by cognitive control when visual stimuli cue the presentation of the deviant and standard sounds. We compared this account with an alternative explanation, namely, that cues may reduce distraction because cue processing depletes attentional resources from the orienting response to the deviant sound. We report the results of an experiment in which participants judged the movement direction of sounds in the absence of cues and in conditions in which the type of sound was cued early or immediately before the sounds. We found that cues predicting the presentation of deviant sounds eliminated behavioral distraction irrespective of the time available to process them. This finding lends support to the contention that distraction by deviant sounds can be reduced through cognitive control and rule out the division of attention as an alternative explanation of our results and those from past studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23565784

Citation

Parmentier, Fabrice B R., and Maria Hebrero. "Cognitive Control of Involuntary Distraction By Deviant Sounds." Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition, vol. 39, no. 5, 2013, pp. 1635-41.
Parmentier FB, Hebrero M. Cognitive control of involuntary distraction by deviant sounds. J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2013;39(5):1635-41.
Parmentier, F. B., & Hebrero, M. (2013). Cognitive control of involuntary distraction by deviant sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39(5), 1635-41. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0032421
Parmentier FB, Hebrero M. Cognitive Control of Involuntary Distraction By Deviant Sounds. J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2013;39(5):1635-41. PubMed PMID: 23565784.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive control of involuntary distraction by deviant sounds. AU - Parmentier,Fabrice B R, AU - Hebrero,Maria, Y1 - 2013/04/08/ PY - 2013/4/10/entrez PY - 2013/4/10/pubmed PY - 2014/4/29/medline SP - 1635 EP - 41 JF - Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition JO - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn VL - 39 IS - 5 N2 - It is well established that a task-irrelevant sound (deviant sound) departing from an otherwise repetitive sequence of sounds (standard sounds) elicits an involuntary capture of attention and orienting response toward the deviant stimulus, resulting in the lengthening of response times in an ongoing task. Some have argued that this type of distraction can be reduced by cognitive control when visual stimuli cue the presentation of the deviant and standard sounds. We compared this account with an alternative explanation, namely, that cues may reduce distraction because cue processing depletes attentional resources from the orienting response to the deviant sound. We report the results of an experiment in which participants judged the movement direction of sounds in the absence of cues and in conditions in which the type of sound was cued early or immediately before the sounds. We found that cues predicting the presentation of deviant sounds eliminated behavioral distraction irrespective of the time available to process them. This finding lends support to the contention that distraction by deviant sounds can be reduced through cognitive control and rule out the division of attention as an alternative explanation of our results and those from past studies. SN - 1939-1285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23565784/Cognitive_control_of_involuntary_distraction_by_deviant_sounds_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/xlm/39/5/1635 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -