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Direct endoscopic probing for congenital lacrimal duct obstruction.
Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2013 Nov; 41(8):729-34.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The most common treatment for congenital lacrimal duct obstruction is standard probing without dacryoendoscopy. However, the lacrimal duct cannot be observed in this procedure. If the probing procedure allows the observation of the lacrimal duct, it could be more successful and safer. To use endoscopic probing to view the lacrimal duct in cases of congenital lacrimal duct obstruction 6 months post-surgery and to evaluate the condition of the lumen while simultaneously performing direct endoscopic probing.

DESIGN

This is a retrospective, non-comparative case series.

PARTICIPANTS

The study participants were 10 children aged 14-74 months, including three children with bilateral obstruction. In total, 13 congenital lacrimal duct obstruction were probed.

METHODS

The patients underwent direct endoscopic probing with dacryoendoscopy instead of blind probing, that is, standard probing without dacryoendoscopy under brief total anaesthesia.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

During the procedure, outcomes were assessed as the endoscope reached the nasal cavity. A successful probing outcome was defined as an absence of tearing and discharge.

RESULTS

Twelve congenital lacrimal duct obstruction were successfully treated by direct endoscopy, whereas one was not. There were various sites of obstruction and various conditions such as oedematous thickening of the mucosa of the lacrimal duct and fibrous tissue because of chronic inflammation. The subjective outcome from their parents by telephonic interview was obtained. Epiphora disappeared in 12/13 (92.3%) of the eyes treated by endoscopy; however, 5/13 (38.5%) of the patients reported occasional discharge from the eyes.

CONCLUSIONS

Direct endoscopic probing is effective and safe to treat cases of congenital lacrimal duct obstruction in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Asama General Hospital, Nagano, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23566023

Citation

Sasaki, Hidenori, et al. "Direct Endoscopic Probing for Congenital Lacrimal Duct Obstruction." Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology, vol. 41, no. 8, 2013, pp. 729-34.
Sasaki H, Takano T, Murakami A. Direct endoscopic probing for congenital lacrimal duct obstruction. Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2013;41(8):729-34.
Sasaki, H., Takano, T., & Murakami, A. (2013). Direct endoscopic probing for congenital lacrimal duct obstruction. Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology, 41(8), 729-34. https://doi.org/10.1111/ceo.12108
Sasaki H, Takano T, Murakami A. Direct Endoscopic Probing for Congenital Lacrimal Duct Obstruction. Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2013;41(8):729-34. PubMed PMID: 23566023.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Direct endoscopic probing for congenital lacrimal duct obstruction. AU - Sasaki,Hidenori, AU - Takano,Toshiyuki, AU - Murakami,Akira, Y1 - 2013/04/29/ PY - 2012/06/22/received PY - 2013/03/14/accepted PY - 2013/4/10/entrez PY - 2013/4/10/pubmed PY - 2014/1/30/medline KW - congenital lacrimal duct obstruction (CLDO) KW - dacryoendoscopy KW - endoscopic probing SP - 729 EP - 34 JF - Clinical & experimental ophthalmology JO - Clin. Experiment. Ophthalmol. VL - 41 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: The most common treatment for congenital lacrimal duct obstruction is standard probing without dacryoendoscopy. However, the lacrimal duct cannot be observed in this procedure. If the probing procedure allows the observation of the lacrimal duct, it could be more successful and safer. To use endoscopic probing to view the lacrimal duct in cases of congenital lacrimal duct obstruction 6 months post-surgery and to evaluate the condition of the lumen while simultaneously performing direct endoscopic probing. DESIGN: This is a retrospective, non-comparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: The study participants were 10 children aged 14-74 months, including three children with bilateral obstruction. In total, 13 congenital lacrimal duct obstruction were probed. METHODS: The patients underwent direct endoscopic probing with dacryoendoscopy instead of blind probing, that is, standard probing without dacryoendoscopy under brief total anaesthesia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: During the procedure, outcomes were assessed as the endoscope reached the nasal cavity. A successful probing outcome was defined as an absence of tearing and discharge. RESULTS: Twelve congenital lacrimal duct obstruction were successfully treated by direct endoscopy, whereas one was not. There were various sites of obstruction and various conditions such as oedematous thickening of the mucosa of the lacrimal duct and fibrous tissue because of chronic inflammation. The subjective outcome from their parents by telephonic interview was obtained. Epiphora disappeared in 12/13 (92.3%) of the eyes treated by endoscopy; however, 5/13 (38.5%) of the patients reported occasional discharge from the eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Direct endoscopic probing is effective and safe to treat cases of congenital lacrimal duct obstruction in children. SN - 1442-9071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23566023/Direct_endoscopic_probing_for_congenital_lacrimal_duct_obstruction_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ceo.12108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -