Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fatty acid correlates of temperament in adolescent boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Abstract

Atypical fatty acid metabolism has been reported in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), however, its relationship with temperament in this population is unclear. The current study investigated the association between blood levels of fatty acids implicated in brain structure and function (omega-3, omega-6, omega-9) and personality traits of stability (neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness) and plasticity (extraversion and openness). Twenty right-handed adolescent boys with ADHD completed a self-report NEO-FFI personality questionnaire, and had fatty acid content assessed from red blood using gas chromatography. Pearson's correlations showed no significant associations between omega-3 levels and personality. After correction for multiple comparisons, Adrenic Acid (C22:4n6) was inversely associated with stability. Oleic acid (C18:1n9) was positively associated with plasticity. Results are in line with a role of fatty acids in brain function. They suggest that those fatty acids that are involved in myelination (Adrenic, Oleic) have the strongest associations with temperament in adolescents with ADHD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, NG1 4BU, United Kingdom. alexander.sumich@ntu.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23566869

Citation

Sumich, Alex L., et al. "Fatty Acid Correlates of Temperament in Adolescent Boys With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder." Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, vol. 88, no. 6, 2013, pp. 431-6.
Sumich AL, Matsudaira T, Heasman B, et al. Fatty acid correlates of temperament in adolescent boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2013;88(6):431-6.
Sumich, A. L., Matsudaira, T., Heasman, B., Gow, R. V., Ibrahimovic, A., Ghebremeskel, K., ... Taylor, E. (2013). Fatty acid correlates of temperament in adolescent boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, 88(6), pp. 431-6. doi:10.1016/j.plefa.2013.03.004.
Sumich AL, et al. Fatty Acid Correlates of Temperament in Adolescent Boys With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2013;88(6):431-6. PubMed PMID: 23566869.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fatty acid correlates of temperament in adolescent boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. AU - Sumich,Alex L, AU - Matsudaira,Toshiko, AU - Heasman,Bryony, AU - Gow,Rachel V, AU - Ibrahimovic,Almira, AU - Ghebremeskel,Kebreab, AU - Crawford,Michael A, AU - Taylor,Eric, Y1 - 2013/04/06/ PY - 2012/12/31/received PY - 2013/03/01/revised PY - 2013/03/05/accepted PY - 2013/4/10/entrez PY - 2013/4/10/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline SP - 431 EP - 6 JF - Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids JO - Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids VL - 88 IS - 6 N2 - Atypical fatty acid metabolism has been reported in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), however, its relationship with temperament in this population is unclear. The current study investigated the association between blood levels of fatty acids implicated in brain structure and function (omega-3, omega-6, omega-9) and personality traits of stability (neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness) and plasticity (extraversion and openness). Twenty right-handed adolescent boys with ADHD completed a self-report NEO-FFI personality questionnaire, and had fatty acid content assessed from red blood using gas chromatography. Pearson's correlations showed no significant associations between omega-3 levels and personality. After correction for multiple comparisons, Adrenic Acid (C22:4n6) was inversely associated with stability. Oleic acid (C18:1n9) was positively associated with plasticity. Results are in line with a role of fatty acids in brain function. They suggest that those fatty acids that are involved in myelination (Adrenic, Oleic) have the strongest associations with temperament in adolescents with ADHD. SN - 1532-2823 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23566869/Fatty_acid_correlates_of_temperament_in_adolescent_boys_with_attention_deficit_hyperactivity_disorder_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0952-3278(13)00053-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -