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The emergence of human coronavirus EMC: how scared should we be?
mBio. 2013 Apr 09; 4(2):e00191-13.MBIO

Abstract

A novel betacoronavirus, human coronavirus (HCoV-EMC), has recently been detected in humans with severe respiratory disease. Further characterization of HCoV-EMC suggests that this virus is different from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) because it is able to replicate in multiple mammalian cell lines and it does not use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 as a receptor to achieve infection. Additional research is urgently needed to better understand the pathogenicity and tissue tropism of this virus in humans. In their recent study published in mBio, Kindler et al. shed some light on these important topics (E. Kindler, H. R. Jónsdóttir, M. Muth, O. J. Hamming, R. Hartmann, R. Rodriguez, R. Geffers, R. A. Fouchier, C. Drosten, M. A. Müller, R. Dijkman, and V. Thiel, mBio 4[1]:e00611-12, 2013). These authors report the use of differentiated pseudostratified human primary airway epithelial cells, an in vitro model with high physiological relevance to the human airway epithelium, to characterize the cellular tropism of HCoV-EMC. More importantly, the authors demonstrate the potential use of type I and type III interferons (IFNs) to control viral infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre of Influenza Research, School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Comment

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23572553

Citation

Chan, Renee W Y., and Leo L M. Poon. "The Emergence of Human Coronavirus EMC: How Scared Should We Be?" MBio, vol. 4, no. 2, 2013, pp. e00191-13.
Chan RW, Poon LL. The emergence of human coronavirus EMC: how scared should we be? mBio. 2013;4(2):e00191-13.
Chan, R. W., & Poon, L. L. (2013). The emergence of human coronavirus EMC: how scared should we be? MBio, 4(2), e00191-13. https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00191-13
Chan RW, Poon LL. The Emergence of Human Coronavirus EMC: How Scared Should We Be. mBio. 2013 Apr 9;4(2):e00191-13. PubMed PMID: 23572553.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The emergence of human coronavirus EMC: how scared should we be? AU - Chan,Renee W Y, AU - Poon,Leo L M, Y1 - 2013/04/09/ PY - 2013/4/11/entrez PY - 2013/4/11/pubmed PY - 2013/8/16/medline SP - e00191 EP - 13 JF - mBio JO - mBio VL - 4 IS - 2 N2 - A novel betacoronavirus, human coronavirus (HCoV-EMC), has recently been detected in humans with severe respiratory disease. Further characterization of HCoV-EMC suggests that this virus is different from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) because it is able to replicate in multiple mammalian cell lines and it does not use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 as a receptor to achieve infection. Additional research is urgently needed to better understand the pathogenicity and tissue tropism of this virus in humans. In their recent study published in mBio, Kindler et al. shed some light on these important topics (E. Kindler, H. R. Jónsdóttir, M. Muth, O. J. Hamming, R. Hartmann, R. Rodriguez, R. Geffers, R. A. Fouchier, C. Drosten, M. A. Müller, R. Dijkman, and V. Thiel, mBio 4[1]:e00611-12, 2013). These authors report the use of differentiated pseudostratified human primary airway epithelial cells, an in vitro model with high physiological relevance to the human airway epithelium, to characterize the cellular tropism of HCoV-EMC. More importantly, the authors demonstrate the potential use of type I and type III interferons (IFNs) to control viral infection. SN - 2150-7511 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23572553/The_emergence_of_human_coronavirus_EMC:_how_scared_should_we_be L2 - http://mbio.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=23572553 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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