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Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, dietary fatty acids and prostate cancer risk.
Int J Cancer 2013; 133(8):1882-91IJ

Abstract

Animal and experimental studies have demonstrated that long-chain n-3 fatty acids inhibit the development of prostate cancer, whereas n-6 fatty acids might promote it. We performed a case-cohort analysis within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study using a random sample of 1,717 men and 464 prostate cancer cases to investigate associations between fatty acids assessed in plasma phospholipids (PPLs) or diet (estimated using a 121-item food frequency questionnaire) and prostate cancer risk. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox regression. Prostate cancer risk was positively associated with %PPL saturated fatty acids (SFAs); HR [95% CI] = 1.51 [1.06, 2.16] (Q5 vs. Q1, fifth vs. first quintile); p-trend = 0.003. HRs (Q5 to Q2 vs. Q1) were significantly elevated for %PPL palmitic acid. %PPL oleic acid was inversely associated with risk, HR = 0.62 [0.43, 0.91] (Q5 vs. Q1); p-trend = 0.04. No statistically significant linear trends were observed for dietary intakes. The HRs were elevated for moderate intakes of linoleic acid (Q2 and Q3 vs. Q1, 1.58 [1.10, 2.28] and 1.70 [1.18, 2.46], respectively), but the increase was not significant for higher intakes (Q4 and Q5). No association varied significantly by tumour aggressiveness (all p-homogeneity > 0.1). Prostate cancer risk was positively associated with %PPL SFA, largely attributable to palmitic acid and inversely associated with %PPL monounsaturated fatty acids, largely attributable to oleic acid. Higher risks were also observed for dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fats, primarily linoleic acid.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Carlton, VIC, Australia. julie.bassett@cancervic.org.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23575905

Citation

Bassett, Julie K., et al. "Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids, Dietary Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Risk." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 133, no. 8, 2013, pp. 1882-91.
Bassett JK, Severi G, Hodge AM, et al. Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, dietary fatty acids and prostate cancer risk. Int J Cancer. 2013;133(8):1882-91.
Bassett, J. K., Severi, G., Hodge, A. M., MacInnis, R. J., Gibson, R. A., Hopper, J. L., ... Giles, G. G. (2013). Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, dietary fatty acids and prostate cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer, 133(8), pp. 1882-91. doi:10.1002/ijc.28203.
Bassett JK, et al. Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids, Dietary Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Risk. Int J Cancer. 2013 Oct 15;133(8):1882-91. PubMed PMID: 23575905.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, dietary fatty acids and prostate cancer risk. AU - Bassett,Julie K, AU - Severi,Gianluca, AU - Hodge,Allison M, AU - MacInnis,Robert J, AU - Gibson,Robert A, AU - Hopper,John L, AU - English,Dallas R, AU - Giles,Graham G, Y1 - 2013/05/09/ PY - 2013/01/17/received PY - 2013/03/28/accepted PY - 2013/4/12/entrez PY - 2013/4/12/pubmed PY - 2013/11/8/medline KW - cohort study KW - fatty acids KW - prostate cancer SP - 1882 EP - 91 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 133 IS - 8 N2 - Animal and experimental studies have demonstrated that long-chain n-3 fatty acids inhibit the development of prostate cancer, whereas n-6 fatty acids might promote it. We performed a case-cohort analysis within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study using a random sample of 1,717 men and 464 prostate cancer cases to investigate associations between fatty acids assessed in plasma phospholipids (PPLs) or diet (estimated using a 121-item food frequency questionnaire) and prostate cancer risk. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox regression. Prostate cancer risk was positively associated with %PPL saturated fatty acids (SFAs); HR [95% CI] = 1.51 [1.06, 2.16] (Q5 vs. Q1, fifth vs. first quintile); p-trend = 0.003. HRs (Q5 to Q2 vs. Q1) were significantly elevated for %PPL palmitic acid. %PPL oleic acid was inversely associated with risk, HR = 0.62 [0.43, 0.91] (Q5 vs. Q1); p-trend = 0.04. No statistically significant linear trends were observed for dietary intakes. The HRs were elevated for moderate intakes of linoleic acid (Q2 and Q3 vs. Q1, 1.58 [1.10, 2.28] and 1.70 [1.18, 2.46], respectively), but the increase was not significant for higher intakes (Q4 and Q5). No association varied significantly by tumour aggressiveness (all p-homogeneity > 0.1). Prostate cancer risk was positively associated with %PPL SFA, largely attributable to palmitic acid and inversely associated with %PPL monounsaturated fatty acids, largely attributable to oleic acid. Higher risks were also observed for dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fats, primarily linoleic acid. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23575905/Plasma_phospholipid_fatty_acids_dietary_fatty_acids_and_prostate_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.28203 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -