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Rabies immunization of travelers in a canine rabies endemic area.
J Travel Med. 2013 May-Jun; 20(3):159-64.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Travelers to countries where rabies is endemic may be at risk of rabies exposure. We assessed rabies immunization of travelers attending a travel clinic in Thailand.

METHODS

The medical charts of international travelers who came for preexposure (PrEP) or postexposure (PEP) rabies prophylaxis at the Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute (QSMI), Bangkok, Thailand between 2001 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed.

RESULTS

A total of 782 travelers, including 188 patients who presented with mammal-associated injuries and possible rabies exposures and 594 persons who came requesting PrEP, were studied. Of the travelers who received PEP, only 27 (14.3%) had been previously immunized against rabies and 141 (75.0%) cases experienced high-risk WHO category III exposure. Most of the incidents were unprovoked. Although promptly seeking medical services after the injuries, 114 (60.7%) travelers did not undertake any first-aid care for their wounds. Of these travelers, 19 (10.3%) received intradermal rabies vaccination as they could complete the series here. Rabies immunoglobulin was given to 118 of 121 (97.5%) patients. About one fourth of recipients could accomplish the full schedule at QSMI. Among visitors who requested PrEP, 454 (76.4%) persons had just started their first dose. Among all visitors, 263 (44.3%) were Japanese. The number of Japanese asking for PrEP was higher in 2006, the year when cases of imported human rabies to Japan were reported. This trend has sustained since then. Two (0.3%) travelers were bitten by suspected rabid dogs before they completed their PrEP program.

CONCLUSION

Rabies prophylaxis is an important decision for each traveler. It should be made before visiting endemic areas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute (WHO Collaborating Centre for Research on Rabies Pathogenesis and Prevention), The Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, Thailand. sudapunrin@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23577861

Citation

Sibunruang, Suda, et al. "Rabies Immunization of Travelers in a Canine Rabies Endemic Area." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 20, no. 3, 2013, pp. 159-64.
Sibunruang S, Tepsumethanon S, Raksakhet N, et al. Rabies immunization of travelers in a canine rabies endemic area. J Travel Med. 2013;20(3):159-64.
Sibunruang, S., Tepsumethanon, S., Raksakhet, N., & Tantawichien, T. (2013). Rabies immunization of travelers in a canine rabies endemic area. Journal of Travel Medicine, 20(3), 159-64. https://doi.org/10.1111/jtm.12023
Sibunruang S, et al. Rabies Immunization of Travelers in a Canine Rabies Endemic Area. J Travel Med. 2013 May-Jun;20(3):159-64. PubMed PMID: 23577861.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rabies immunization of travelers in a canine rabies endemic area. AU - Sibunruang,Suda, AU - Tepsumethanon,Saowaluck, AU - Raksakhet,Natthasri, AU - Tantawichien,Terapong, Y1 - 2013/03/08/ PY - 2012/08/10/received PY - 2012/11/25/revised PY - 2012/12/20/accepted PY - 2013/4/13/entrez PY - 2013/4/13/pubmed PY - 2013/11/5/medline SP - 159 EP - 64 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Travelers to countries where rabies is endemic may be at risk of rabies exposure. We assessed rabies immunization of travelers attending a travel clinic in Thailand. METHODS: The medical charts of international travelers who came for preexposure (PrEP) or postexposure (PEP) rabies prophylaxis at the Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute (QSMI), Bangkok, Thailand between 2001 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 782 travelers, including 188 patients who presented with mammal-associated injuries and possible rabies exposures and 594 persons who came requesting PrEP, were studied. Of the travelers who received PEP, only 27 (14.3%) had been previously immunized against rabies and 141 (75.0%) cases experienced high-risk WHO category III exposure. Most of the incidents were unprovoked. Although promptly seeking medical services after the injuries, 114 (60.7%) travelers did not undertake any first-aid care for their wounds. Of these travelers, 19 (10.3%) received intradermal rabies vaccination as they could complete the series here. Rabies immunoglobulin was given to 118 of 121 (97.5%) patients. About one fourth of recipients could accomplish the full schedule at QSMI. Among visitors who requested PrEP, 454 (76.4%) persons had just started their first dose. Among all visitors, 263 (44.3%) were Japanese. The number of Japanese asking for PrEP was higher in 2006, the year when cases of imported human rabies to Japan were reported. This trend has sustained since then. Two (0.3%) travelers were bitten by suspected rabid dogs before they completed their PrEP program. CONCLUSION: Rabies prophylaxis is an important decision for each traveler. It should be made before visiting endemic areas. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23577861/Rabies_immunization_of_travelers_in_a_canine_rabies_endemic_area_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/jtm.12023 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -