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Association between physical activity and mortality in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
Int J Cancer 2013; 133(8):1905-13IJ

Abstract

Several prospective cohort studies have examined the association between prediagnosis and/or postdiagnosis physical activity (PA) on colorectal cancer outcomes and reported conflicting results. To quantitatively assess this association, we have conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Databases and reference lists of relevant studies were searched using MEDLINE and EMBASE up to January 2013. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects models. For this meta-analysis, a total of seven prospective cohort studies were included. The analysis included 5,299 patients for prediagnosis PA and 6,348 patients for postdiagnosis PA, followed up over a period ranging from 3.8 to 11.9 years. The analyses showed that patients who participated in any amount of PA before diagnosis had a RR of 0.75 (95% CI: 0.65-0.87, p < 0.001) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality compared to patients who did not participate in any PA. Those who participated in high PA before diagnosis (vs. low PA) had a RR of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56-0.87, p = 0.002). Similarly, patients who participated in any PA after diagnosis had a RR of 0.74 (95% CI: 0.58-0.95, p = 0.02) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality compared to patients who did not participate in any PA. Those who participated in high PA after diagnosis (vs. low PA) had a RR of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.47-0.92, p = 0.01). Similar inverse associations of prediagnosis or postdiagnosis PA were found for all-cause mortality. In conclusion, both prediagnosis and postdiagnosis PA were associated with reduced colorectal cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23580314

Citation

Je, Youjin, et al. "Association Between Physical Activity and Mortality in Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 133, no. 8, 2013, pp. 1905-13.
Je Y, Jeon JY, Giovannucci EL, et al. Association between physical activity and mortality in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Int J Cancer. 2013;133(8):1905-13.
Je, Y., Jeon, J. Y., Giovannucci, E. L., & Meyerhardt, J. A. (2013). Association between physical activity and mortality in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. International Journal of Cancer, 133(8), pp. 1905-13. doi:10.1002/ijc.28208.
Je Y, et al. Association Between Physical Activity and Mortality in Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Int J Cancer. 2013 Oct 15;133(8):1905-13. PubMed PMID: 23580314.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between physical activity and mortality in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Je,Youjin, AU - Jeon,Justin Y, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Meyerhardt,Jeffrey A, Y1 - 2013/07/10/ PY - 2013/02/08/received PY - 2013/03/28/accepted PY - 2013/4/13/entrez PY - 2013/4/13/pubmed PY - 2013/11/8/medline KW - cancer KW - colon KW - exercise KW - mortality KW - physical activity KW - rectum SP - 1905 EP - 13 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 133 IS - 8 N2 - Several prospective cohort studies have examined the association between prediagnosis and/or postdiagnosis physical activity (PA) on colorectal cancer outcomes and reported conflicting results. To quantitatively assess this association, we have conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Databases and reference lists of relevant studies were searched using MEDLINE and EMBASE up to January 2013. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects models. For this meta-analysis, a total of seven prospective cohort studies were included. The analysis included 5,299 patients for prediagnosis PA and 6,348 patients for postdiagnosis PA, followed up over a period ranging from 3.8 to 11.9 years. The analyses showed that patients who participated in any amount of PA before diagnosis had a RR of 0.75 (95% CI: 0.65-0.87, p < 0.001) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality compared to patients who did not participate in any PA. Those who participated in high PA before diagnosis (vs. low PA) had a RR of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56-0.87, p = 0.002). Similarly, patients who participated in any PA after diagnosis had a RR of 0.74 (95% CI: 0.58-0.95, p = 0.02) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality compared to patients who did not participate in any PA. Those who participated in high PA after diagnosis (vs. low PA) had a RR of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.47-0.92, p = 0.01). Similar inverse associations of prediagnosis or postdiagnosis PA were found for all-cause mortality. In conclusion, both prediagnosis and postdiagnosis PA were associated with reduced colorectal cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23580314/Association_between_physical_activity_and_mortality_in_colorectal_cancer:_a_meta_analysis_of_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.28208 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -