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Molecular mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of diallyl disulfide.
Food Chem Toxicol 2013; 57:362-70FC

Abstract

Considerable evidence in recent years suggests that garlic has anti-proliferative effects against various types of cancer. Garlic contains water-soluble and oil-soluble sulfur compounds. Oil-soluble compounds such as diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DADS), diallyl trisulfide (DATS) and ajoene are more effective than water-soluble compounds in protection against cancer. DADS, a major organosulfur compound derived from garlic, can decrease carcinogen-induced cancers in experimental animals and inhibit the proliferation of various types of cancer cells. Its mechanisms of action include: the activation of metabolizing enzymes that detoxify carcinogens; suppression of the formation of DNA adducts; antioxidant effects; regulation of cell-cycle arrest; induction of apoptosis and differentiation; histone modification; and inhibition of angiogenesis and invasion. These topics are discussed in depth in this review.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Research Institute, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan Province, China.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23583486

Citation

Yi, Lan, and Qi Su. "Molecular Mechanisms for the Anti-cancer Effects of Diallyl Disulfide." Food and Chemical Toxicology : an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, vol. 57, 2013, pp. 362-70.
Yi L, Su Q. Molecular mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of diallyl disulfide. Food Chem Toxicol. 2013;57:362-70.
Yi, L., & Su, Q. (2013). Molecular mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of diallyl disulfide. Food and Chemical Toxicology : an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 57, pp. 362-70. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2013.04.001.
Yi L, Su Q. Molecular Mechanisms for the Anti-cancer Effects of Diallyl Disulfide. Food Chem Toxicol. 2013;57:362-70. PubMed PMID: 23583486.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Molecular mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of diallyl disulfide. AU - Yi,Lan, AU - Su,Qi, Y1 - 2013/04/09/ PY - 2012/08/21/received PY - 2013/03/31/revised PY - 2013/04/01/accepted PY - 2013/4/16/entrez PY - 2013/4/16/pubmed PY - 2014/1/25/medline SP - 362 EP - 70 JF - Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association JO - Food Chem. Toxicol. VL - 57 N2 - Considerable evidence in recent years suggests that garlic has anti-proliferative effects against various types of cancer. Garlic contains water-soluble and oil-soluble sulfur compounds. Oil-soluble compounds such as diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DADS), diallyl trisulfide (DATS) and ajoene are more effective than water-soluble compounds in protection against cancer. DADS, a major organosulfur compound derived from garlic, can decrease carcinogen-induced cancers in experimental animals and inhibit the proliferation of various types of cancer cells. Its mechanisms of action include: the activation of metabolizing enzymes that detoxify carcinogens; suppression of the formation of DNA adducts; antioxidant effects; regulation of cell-cycle arrest; induction of apoptosis and differentiation; histone modification; and inhibition of angiogenesis and invasion. These topics are discussed in depth in this review. SN - 1873-6351 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23583486/Molecular_mechanisms_for_the_anti_cancer_effects_of_diallyl_disulfide_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-6915(13)00224-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -