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Human rhinovirus and wheezing: short and long-term associations in children.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Aug; 32(8):827-33.PI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have been suggested to play a role in the development of childhood wheezing. However, whether HRV is causally related to the development of wheezing or HRV-associated wheeze is merely an indicator of disease susceptibility is unclear. Our aim was to study the role of HRV during infancy in the development of lower respiratory disease during infancy and childhood.

METHODS

In a population-based birth cohort, during the 1st year of life, nose and throat swabs were collected on a monthly basis, regardless of any symptoms. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect an extensive panel of respiratory pathogens. Lung function was measured before 2 months of age. Information on respiratory symptoms was collected by daily questionnaires and electronic patient files.

RESULTS

1425 samples were collected in 140 infants. Both the presence of (single or multiple) pathogens (HRV equal to other pathogens) and increased respiratory system resistance were significantly associated with lower respiratory symptoms during infancy. HRV presence during infancy was not associated with the risk of wheezing at age 4, but every HRV episode with wheezing increased the risk of wheezing at age 4 (odds ratio 1.9, 1.1-3.5). This association weakened after adjustment for lung function (odds ratio 1.4, 0.7-2.9).

CONCLUSIONS

HRV and other viruses are associated with lower respiratory symptoms during infancy, as well as a high presymptomatic respiratory system resistance. HRV presence during infancy is not associated with childhood wheezing, but wheeze during a HRV episode is an indicator of children at high risk for childhood wheeze, partly because of a reduced neonatal lung function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. a.c.vandergugten@umcutrecht.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23584579

Citation

van der Gugten, Anne C., et al. "Human Rhinovirus and Wheezing: Short and Long-term Associations in Children." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 32, no. 8, 2013, pp. 827-33.
van der Gugten AC, van der Zalm MM, Uiterwaal CS, et al. Human rhinovirus and wheezing: short and long-term associations in children. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(8):827-33.
van der Gugten, A. C., van der Zalm, M. M., Uiterwaal, C. S., Wilbrink, B., Rossen, J. W., & van der Ent, C. K. (2013). Human rhinovirus and wheezing: short and long-term associations in children. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 32(8), 827-33. https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e318290620e
van der Gugten AC, et al. Human Rhinovirus and Wheezing: Short and Long-term Associations in Children. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(8):827-33. PubMed PMID: 23584579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human rhinovirus and wheezing: short and long-term associations in children. AU - van der Gugten,Anne C, AU - van der Zalm,Marieke M, AU - Uiterwaal,Cuno S P M, AU - Wilbrink,Berry, AU - Rossen,John W A, AU - van der Ent,Cornelis K, PY - 2013/4/16/entrez PY - 2013/4/16/pubmed PY - 2014/5/10/medline SP - 827 EP - 33 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 32 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have been suggested to play a role in the development of childhood wheezing. However, whether HRV is causally related to the development of wheezing or HRV-associated wheeze is merely an indicator of disease susceptibility is unclear. Our aim was to study the role of HRV during infancy in the development of lower respiratory disease during infancy and childhood. METHODS: In a population-based birth cohort, during the 1st year of life, nose and throat swabs were collected on a monthly basis, regardless of any symptoms. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect an extensive panel of respiratory pathogens. Lung function was measured before 2 months of age. Information on respiratory symptoms was collected by daily questionnaires and electronic patient files. RESULTS: 1425 samples were collected in 140 infants. Both the presence of (single or multiple) pathogens (HRV equal to other pathogens) and increased respiratory system resistance were significantly associated with lower respiratory symptoms during infancy. HRV presence during infancy was not associated with the risk of wheezing at age 4, but every HRV episode with wheezing increased the risk of wheezing at age 4 (odds ratio 1.9, 1.1-3.5). This association weakened after adjustment for lung function (odds ratio 1.4, 0.7-2.9). CONCLUSIONS: HRV and other viruses are associated with lower respiratory symptoms during infancy, as well as a high presymptomatic respiratory system resistance. HRV presence during infancy is not associated with childhood wheezing, but wheeze during a HRV episode is an indicator of children at high risk for childhood wheeze, partly because of a reduced neonatal lung function. SN - 1532-0987 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23584579/Human_rhinovirus_and_wheezing:_short_and_long_term_associations_in_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e318290620e DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -