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Relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in Taiwanese adolescents.
J Sch Health 2013; 83(6):454-62JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study examined the relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in adolescents.

METHODS

In 2010, a total of 2992 10th grade students recruited from 26 high schools in Taipei, Taiwan completed questionnaires.

RESULTS

More than one third of students had either engaged in cyberbullying or had been the target (cybervictim) of it in the last year. About 18.4% had been cyberbullied (cybervictim); 5.8% had cyberbullied others (cyberbully); 11.2% had both cyberbullied others and been cyberbullied (cyberbully-victim). About 8.2% had been bullied in school (victim); 10.6% had bullied others (bully); and, 5.1% had both bullied others and had been bullied in school (bully-victim). Students with Internet risk behaviors were more likely to be involved in cyberbullying and/or cybervictimization; students who had cyberbullying or victimization experiences also tended to be involved in school bullying/victimization. After controlling for sex, academic performance, and household poverty, cyber/school victims and bully-victims were more likely to have lower self-esteem, and cyber/school victims, bullies and bully-victims were at a greater risk for serious depression.

CONCLUSIONS

Both cyberbullying and school bullying and/or victimization experiences were independently associated with increased depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Promotion and Health Education, National Taiwan Normal University, 162, Ho-Ping E. Road, Sec.1, Taipei 10610, Taiwan. fongchingchang@ntnu.edu.twNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23586891

Citation

Chang, Fong-Ching, et al. "Relationships Among Cyberbullying, School Bullying, and Mental Health in Taiwanese Adolescents." The Journal of School Health, vol. 83, no. 6, 2013, pp. 454-62.
Chang FC, Lee CM, Chiu CH, et al. Relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in Taiwanese adolescents. J Sch Health. 2013;83(6):454-62.
Chang, F. C., Lee, C. M., Chiu, C. H., Hsi, W. Y., Huang, T. F., & Pan, Y. C. (2013). Relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in Taiwanese adolescents. The Journal of School Health, 83(6), pp. 454-62. doi:10.1111/josh.12050.
Chang FC, et al. Relationships Among Cyberbullying, School Bullying, and Mental Health in Taiwanese Adolescents. J Sch Health. 2013;83(6):454-62. PubMed PMID: 23586891.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in Taiwanese adolescents. AU - Chang,Fong-Ching, AU - Lee,Ching-Mei, AU - Chiu,Chiung-Hui, AU - Hsi,Wen-Yun, AU - Huang,Tzu-Fu, AU - Pan,Yun-Chieh, PY - 2011/08/31/received PY - 2012/06/08/accepted PY - 2013/4/17/entrez PY - 2013/4/17/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline SP - 454 EP - 62 JF - The Journal of school health JO - J Sch Health VL - 83 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study examined the relationships among cyberbullying, school bullying, and mental health in adolescents. METHODS: In 2010, a total of 2992 10th grade students recruited from 26 high schools in Taipei, Taiwan completed questionnaires. RESULTS: More than one third of students had either engaged in cyberbullying or had been the target (cybervictim) of it in the last year. About 18.4% had been cyberbullied (cybervictim); 5.8% had cyberbullied others (cyberbully); 11.2% had both cyberbullied others and been cyberbullied (cyberbully-victim). About 8.2% had been bullied in school (victim); 10.6% had bullied others (bully); and, 5.1% had both bullied others and had been bullied in school (bully-victim). Students with Internet risk behaviors were more likely to be involved in cyberbullying and/or cybervictimization; students who had cyberbullying or victimization experiences also tended to be involved in school bullying/victimization. After controlling for sex, academic performance, and household poverty, cyber/school victims and bully-victims were more likely to have lower self-esteem, and cyber/school victims, bullies and bully-victims were at a greater risk for serious depression. CONCLUSIONS: Both cyberbullying and school bullying and/or victimization experiences were independently associated with increased depression. SN - 1746-1561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23586891/Relationships_among_cyberbullying_school_bullying_and_mental_health_in_Taiwanese_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12050 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -