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Cognitive and social factors associated with NSSI and suicide attempts in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents.
J Abnorm Child Psychol 2013; 41(6):1005-13JA

Abstract

Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SA) frequently co-occur among youth, there is increasing evidence that both the risk factors and the phenomenology of the behaviors are distinct. This study examined how individuals who engage in NSSI only, individuals who attempt suicide only, and those who have histories of both NSSI and at least one suicide attempt may differ in terms of cognitions and perceived social support. Participants were 185 adolescents (78.1 % female) between the ages of 13 and 18 recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility in the northeastern United States. One hundred forty-eight teens were identified with a history of self-injurious behavior and divided into three groups: NSSI only (n = 45), SA only (n = 24) or both NSSI and SA (NSSI+SA; n = 79). Analyses showed that the NSSI+SA group exhibited more cognitive errors, negative self-statements, and negative views of self, world, and future, as well as less perceived familial support than either the NSSI or SA only groups. There were no differences between groups on perceived support from teachers or peers. No significant demographic or diagnostic differences were found between the NSSI and SA groups. Limitations and clinical implications of the current research are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 1 Hoppin St, Providence, RI 02903, USA. jennifer_wolff@brown.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23588400

Citation

Wolff, Jennifer, et al. "Cognitive and Social Factors Associated With NSSI and Suicide Attempts in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents." Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 41, no. 6, 2013, pp. 1005-13.
Wolff J, Frazier EA, Esposito-Smythers C, et al. Cognitive and social factors associated with NSSI and suicide attempts in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2013;41(6):1005-13.
Wolff, J., Frazier, E. A., Esposito-Smythers, C., Burke, T., Sloan, E., & Spirito, A. (2013). Cognitive and social factors associated with NSSI and suicide attempts in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 41(6), pp. 1005-13. doi:10.1007/s10802-013-9743-y.
Wolff J, et al. Cognitive and Social Factors Associated With NSSI and Suicide Attempts in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2013;41(6):1005-13. PubMed PMID: 23588400.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive and social factors associated with NSSI and suicide attempts in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. AU - Wolff,Jennifer, AU - Frazier,Elisabeth A, AU - Esposito-Smythers,Christianne, AU - Burke,Taylor, AU - Sloan,Emma, AU - Spirito,Anthony, PY - 2013/4/17/entrez PY - 2013/4/17/pubmed PY - 2013/10/22/medline SP - 1005 EP - 13 JF - Journal of abnormal child psychology JO - J Abnorm Child Psychol VL - 41 IS - 6 N2 - Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SA) frequently co-occur among youth, there is increasing evidence that both the risk factors and the phenomenology of the behaviors are distinct. This study examined how individuals who engage in NSSI only, individuals who attempt suicide only, and those who have histories of both NSSI and at least one suicide attempt may differ in terms of cognitions and perceived social support. Participants were 185 adolescents (78.1 % female) between the ages of 13 and 18 recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility in the northeastern United States. One hundred forty-eight teens were identified with a history of self-injurious behavior and divided into three groups: NSSI only (n = 45), SA only (n = 24) or both NSSI and SA (NSSI+SA; n = 79). Analyses showed that the NSSI+SA group exhibited more cognitive errors, negative self-statements, and negative views of self, world, and future, as well as less perceived familial support than either the NSSI or SA only groups. There were no differences between groups on perceived support from teachers or peers. No significant demographic or diagnostic differences were found between the NSSI and SA groups. Limitations and clinical implications of the current research are discussed. SN - 1573-2835 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23588400/Cognitive_and_social_factors_associated_with_NSSI_and_suicide_attempts_in_psychiatrically_hospitalized_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-013-9743-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -