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Index-based dietary patterns and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in a large cohort study.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2013; 11(9):1130-1136.e2CG

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Diet could affect risk for esophageal and gastric cancers, but associations have been inconsistent. The diet is complex, so studies of dietary patterns, rather than studies of individual foods, might be more likely to identify cancer risk factors. There is limited research on index-based dietary patterns and esophageal and gastric cancers. We prospectively evaluated associations between the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) and alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED) scores and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers.

METHODS

We analyzed data from 494,968 participants in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health study, in which AARP members (age, 51-70 y) completed a self-administered baseline food frequency questionnaire between 1995 and 1996. Their answers were used to estimate scores for each index.

RESULTS

During the follow-up period (1995-2006), participants developed 215 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs), 633 esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs), 453 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas, and 501 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas. Higher scores from the HEI-2005 were associated with a reduced risk of ESCC (comparing the highest quintile with the lowest quintile: hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.86; Ptrend = .001) and EAC (hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.98; Ptrend = .01). We observed an inverse association between ESCC, but not EAC, and a higher aMED score (meaning a higher-quality diet). HEI-2005 and aMED scores were not associated significantly with gastric cardia or noncardia adenocarcinomas.

CONCLUSIONS

By using data collected from 1995 through 2006 from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study, HEI-2005 and aMED scores were associated inversely with risk for esophageal cancers, particularly ESCC. Adherence to dietary recommendations might help prevent esophageal cancers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Genetic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA. liw9@mail.nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23591281

Citation

Li, Wen-Qing, et al. "Index-based Dietary Patterns and Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Cancer in a Large Cohort Study." Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, vol. 11, no. 9, 2013, pp. 1130-1136.e2.
Li WQ, Park Y, Wu JW, et al. Index-based dietary patterns and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in a large cohort study. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013;11(9):1130-1136.e2.
Li, W. Q., Park, Y., Wu, J. W., Ren, J. S., Goldstein, A. M., Taylor, P. R., ... Abnet, C. C. (2013). Index-based dietary patterns and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in a large cohort study. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, 11(9), pp. 1130-1136.e2. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2013.03.023.
Li WQ, et al. Index-based Dietary Patterns and Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Cancer in a Large Cohort Study. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013;11(9):1130-1136.e2. PubMed PMID: 23591281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Index-based dietary patterns and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in a large cohort study. AU - Li,Wen-Qing, AU - Park,Yikyung, AU - Wu,Jennifer W, AU - Ren,Jian-Song, AU - Goldstein,Alisa M, AU - Taylor,Philip R, AU - Hollenbeck,Albert R, AU - Freedman,Neal D, AU - Abnet,Christian C, Y1 - 2013/04/13/ PY - 2012/12/19/received PY - 2013/02/15/revised PY - 2013/03/01/accepted PY - 2013/4/18/entrez PY - 2013/4/18/pubmed PY - 2014/3/19/medline KW - Alternate Mediterranean Diet KW - CI KW - EAC KW - ESCC KW - Esophageal Neoplasms KW - FFQ KW - Food Habits KW - GC KW - HEI-2005 KW - HR KW - Healthy Eating Index-2005 KW - ICD-O KW - International Classification of Disease for Oncology KW - SoFAAS KW - Stomach Neoplasms KW - UGI KW - aMED KW - confidence interval KW - esophageal adenocarcinoma KW - esophageal squamous cell carcinoma KW - food frequency questionnaire KW - gastric cancer KW - hazard ratio KW - solid fat, alcohol, and added sugar KW - upper gastrointestinal SP - 1130 EP - 1136.e2 JF - Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association JO - Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 11 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Diet could affect risk for esophageal and gastric cancers, but associations have been inconsistent. The diet is complex, so studies of dietary patterns, rather than studies of individual foods, might be more likely to identify cancer risk factors. There is limited research on index-based dietary patterns and esophageal and gastric cancers. We prospectively evaluated associations between the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) and alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED) scores and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers. METHODS: We analyzed data from 494,968 participants in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health study, in which AARP members (age, 51-70 y) completed a self-administered baseline food frequency questionnaire between 1995 and 1996. Their answers were used to estimate scores for each index. RESULTS: During the follow-up period (1995-2006), participants developed 215 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs), 633 esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs), 453 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas, and 501 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas. Higher scores from the HEI-2005 were associated with a reduced risk of ESCC (comparing the highest quintile with the lowest quintile: hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.86; Ptrend = .001) and EAC (hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.98; Ptrend = .01). We observed an inverse association between ESCC, but not EAC, and a higher aMED score (meaning a higher-quality diet). HEI-2005 and aMED scores were not associated significantly with gastric cardia or noncardia adenocarcinomas. CONCLUSIONS: By using data collected from 1995 through 2006 from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study, HEI-2005 and aMED scores were associated inversely with risk for esophageal cancers, particularly ESCC. Adherence to dietary recommendations might help prevent esophageal cancers. SN - 1542-7714 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23591281/Index_based_dietary_patterns_and_risk_of_esophageal_and_gastric_cancer_in_a_large_cohort_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1542-3565(13)00463-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -