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Obesity and risk of hip fracture in adults: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
PLoS One 2013; 8(4):e55077Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many observational studies assessed the association between obesity and risk of hip fracture in adults, but reported controversial results. Our goal was to evaluate the association between obesity and risk of hip fracture in adults by conducting a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

METHODS

Three databases, PubMed, Embase and Web of Science, were searched through May 2012 to identify eligible cohort studies. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled relative risk (RR) with its 95% confidence interval (95%CI).

RESULTS

Fifteen prospective cohort studies involving a total 3,126,313 participants were finally included into this meta-analysis. Overall, adults with obesity compared with the normal weight group had a significantly decreased risk of hip fracture (RR: 0.66, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.77, P<0.001). Meta-analyses by the adjusted status of RRs also suggested adults with obesity compared with the reference group had a significantly decreased risk of hip fracture (adjusted RR: 0.48, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.58, P<0.001; unadjusted RR: 0.66, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.78, P<0.001). Subgroup analyses by gender suggested individuals with obesity had a significantly decreased risk for developing hip fracture compared with the reference group in both men (RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.60, P<0.001) and women (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.84, P<0.001). No evidence of publication bias was observed in this meta-analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies suggests that obesity significantly decreases the risk of hip fracture in adults, and obesity is probably a protective factor of hip fracture in adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Orthopaedic Department, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23593112

Citation

Tang, Xianye, et al. "Obesity and Risk of Hip Fracture in Adults: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 4, 2013, pp. e55077.
Tang X, Liu G, Kang J, et al. Obesity and risk of hip fracture in adults: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(4):e55077.
Tang, X., Liu, G., Kang, J., Hou, Y., Jiang, F., Yuan, W., & Shi, J. (2013). Obesity and risk of hip fracture in adults: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. PloS One, 8(4), pp. e55077. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0055077.
Tang X, et al. Obesity and Risk of Hip Fracture in Adults: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(4):e55077. PubMed PMID: 23593112.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity and risk of hip fracture in adults: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Tang,Xianye, AU - Liu,Gang, AU - Kang,Jian, AU - Hou,Yang, AU - Jiang,Fungui, AU - Yuan,Wen, AU - Shi,Jiangang, Y1 - 2013/04/12/ PY - 2012/08/29/received PY - 2012/12/18/accepted PY - 2013/4/18/entrez PY - 2013/4/18/pubmed PY - 2013/10/23/medline SP - e55077 EP - e55077 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many observational studies assessed the association between obesity and risk of hip fracture in adults, but reported controversial results. Our goal was to evaluate the association between obesity and risk of hip fracture in adults by conducting a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. METHODS: Three databases, PubMed, Embase and Web of Science, were searched through May 2012 to identify eligible cohort studies. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled relative risk (RR) with its 95% confidence interval (95%CI). RESULTS: Fifteen prospective cohort studies involving a total 3,126,313 participants were finally included into this meta-analysis. Overall, adults with obesity compared with the normal weight group had a significantly decreased risk of hip fracture (RR: 0.66, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.77, P<0.001). Meta-analyses by the adjusted status of RRs also suggested adults with obesity compared with the reference group had a significantly decreased risk of hip fracture (adjusted RR: 0.48, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.58, P<0.001; unadjusted RR: 0.66, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.78, P<0.001). Subgroup analyses by gender suggested individuals with obesity had a significantly decreased risk for developing hip fracture compared with the reference group in both men (RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.60, P<0.001) and women (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.84, P<0.001). No evidence of publication bias was observed in this meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies suggests that obesity significantly decreases the risk of hip fracture in adults, and obesity is probably a protective factor of hip fracture in adults. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23593112/Obesity_and_risk_of_hip_fracture_in_adults:_a_meta_analysis_of_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0055077 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -