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Placebo effects in hearing-aid trials are reliable.
Int J Audiol. 2013 Jul; 52(7):472-7.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

A recent study suggested that placebo effects are a source of bias in non-blinded hearing-aid trials. Given the potential impact of this finding on the interpretation of non-blinded trials and design of future research trials, the objective of the present study was to investigate the reliability of this effect.

DESIGN

Using the same procedure as an earlier study, participants were told that they were taking part in a trial of new hearing-aid technology. Participants compared two devices that were acoustically identical, except one was described as "new" and the other as "conventional". Participants completed a speech-in-noise test, sound quality ratings, and rated overall personal preference for both hearing aids.

STUDY SAMPLE

Sixteen adult hearing-aid users.

RESULTS

Participants had significantly better mean speech-in-noise performance (70.9% versus 66.8%, Z = 2.30, p = 0.02, effect size Pearson's r = 0.15) and sound quality ratings for the "new" hearing aid (8.1 versus 7.4, Z = - 2.99, p = 0.003, r = 0.28). A significant proportion of participants (75%) expressed an overall preference for the "new" hearing aid (p = 0.001, effect size φc = 0.66).

CONCLUSION

Placebo effects reliably impact on hearing-aid trials. In order to control for placebo effects, double-blind methodology is optimal. However, when double-blinding is not possible other strategies may be appropriate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Audiology and Deafness Research Group, School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. piers.dawes@manchester.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23594421

Citation

Dawes, Piers, et al. "Placebo Effects in Hearing-aid Trials Are Reliable." International Journal of Audiology, vol. 52, no. 7, 2013, pp. 472-7.
Dawes P, Hopkins R, Munro KJ. Placebo effects in hearing-aid trials are reliable. Int J Audiol. 2013;52(7):472-7.
Dawes, P., Hopkins, R., & Munro, K. J. (2013). Placebo effects in hearing-aid trials are reliable. International Journal of Audiology, 52(7), 472-7. https://doi.org/10.3109/14992027.2013.783718
Dawes P, Hopkins R, Munro KJ. Placebo Effects in Hearing-aid Trials Are Reliable. Int J Audiol. 2013;52(7):472-7. PubMed PMID: 23594421.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Placebo effects in hearing-aid trials are reliable. AU - Dawes,Piers, AU - Hopkins,Rachel, AU - Munro,Kevin J, Y1 - 2013/04/18/ PY - 2013/4/19/entrez PY - 2013/4/19/pubmed PY - 2014/1/25/medline SP - 472 EP - 7 JF - International journal of audiology JO - Int J Audiol VL - 52 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: A recent study suggested that placebo effects are a source of bias in non-blinded hearing-aid trials. Given the potential impact of this finding on the interpretation of non-blinded trials and design of future research trials, the objective of the present study was to investigate the reliability of this effect. DESIGN: Using the same procedure as an earlier study, participants were told that they were taking part in a trial of new hearing-aid technology. Participants compared two devices that were acoustically identical, except one was described as "new" and the other as "conventional". Participants completed a speech-in-noise test, sound quality ratings, and rated overall personal preference for both hearing aids. STUDY SAMPLE: Sixteen adult hearing-aid users. RESULTS: Participants had significantly better mean speech-in-noise performance (70.9% versus 66.8%, Z = 2.30, p = 0.02, effect size Pearson's r = 0.15) and sound quality ratings for the "new" hearing aid (8.1 versus 7.4, Z = - 2.99, p = 0.003, r = 0.28). A significant proportion of participants (75%) expressed an overall preference for the "new" hearing aid (p = 0.001, effect size φc = 0.66). CONCLUSION: Placebo effects reliably impact on hearing-aid trials. In order to control for placebo effects, double-blind methodology is optimal. However, when double-blinding is not possible other strategies may be appropriate. SN - 1708-8186 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23594421/Placebo_effects_in_hearing_aid_trials_are_reliable_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/14992027.2013.783718 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -