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Intersecting identities and the association between bullying and suicide attempt among New York city youths: results from the 2009 New York city youth risk behavior survey.
Am J Public Health. 2013 Jun; 103(6):1082-9.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We examined the intersections of sexual minority, gender, and Hispanic ethnic identities and their interaction with experiences of bullying in predicting suicide attempt among New York City youths.

METHODS

We performed secondary data analysis of the 2009 New York City Youth Risk Behavior Survey, using logistic regression to examine the association of sexual identity, gender, ethnicity, and bullying with suicide attempt. We stratified results on these measures and reported adjusted odds ratios.

RESULTS

Compared with non-sexual minority youths, sexual minority youths had 4.39 and 1.96 times higher odds, respectively, of attempting suicide and reporting bullying. Identity variables did not interact with bullying in predicting suicide attempt individually; however, a four-way interaction term was significant. The effect of bullying on suicide attempt was strongest among non-Hispanic sexual minority male youths (odds ratio = 21.39 vs 1.65-3.38 for other groups).

CONCLUSIONS

Sexual minority, gender, and ethnic identities interact with bullying in predicting suicide attempt among New York City youths. Interventions to limit both the prevalence and the effect of bullying among minority youths should consider an intersectional approach that considers ethnic, gender, and sexual identities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The City University of New York School of Public Health at Hunter College, New York, NY 10035, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23597376

Citation

LeVasseur, Michael T., et al. "Intersecting Identities and the Association Between Bullying and Suicide Attempt Among New York City Youths: Results From the 2009 New York City Youth Risk Behavior Survey." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 103, no. 6, 2013, pp. 1082-9.
LeVasseur MT, Kelvin EA, Grosskopf NA. Intersecting identities and the association between bullying and suicide attempt among New York city youths: results from the 2009 New York city youth risk behavior survey. Am J Public Health. 2013;103(6):1082-9.
LeVasseur, M. T., Kelvin, E. A., & Grosskopf, N. A. (2013). Intersecting identities and the association between bullying and suicide attempt among New York city youths: results from the 2009 New York city youth risk behavior survey. American Journal of Public Health, 103(6), 1082-9. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300994
LeVasseur MT, Kelvin EA, Grosskopf NA. Intersecting Identities and the Association Between Bullying and Suicide Attempt Among New York City Youths: Results From the 2009 New York City Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Am J Public Health. 2013;103(6):1082-9. PubMed PMID: 23597376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intersecting identities and the association between bullying and suicide attempt among New York city youths: results from the 2009 New York city youth risk behavior survey. AU - LeVasseur,Michael T, AU - Kelvin,Elizabeth A, AU - Grosskopf,Nicholas A, Y1 - 2013/04/18/ PY - 2013/4/20/entrez PY - 2013/4/20/pubmed PY - 2013/7/10/medline SP - 1082 EP - 9 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 103 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We examined the intersections of sexual minority, gender, and Hispanic ethnic identities and their interaction with experiences of bullying in predicting suicide attempt among New York City youths. METHODS: We performed secondary data analysis of the 2009 New York City Youth Risk Behavior Survey, using logistic regression to examine the association of sexual identity, gender, ethnicity, and bullying with suicide attempt. We stratified results on these measures and reported adjusted odds ratios. RESULTS: Compared with non-sexual minority youths, sexual minority youths had 4.39 and 1.96 times higher odds, respectively, of attempting suicide and reporting bullying. Identity variables did not interact with bullying in predicting suicide attempt individually; however, a four-way interaction term was significant. The effect of bullying on suicide attempt was strongest among non-Hispanic sexual minority male youths (odds ratio = 21.39 vs 1.65-3.38 for other groups). CONCLUSIONS: Sexual minority, gender, and ethnic identities interact with bullying in predicting suicide attempt among New York City youths. Interventions to limit both the prevalence and the effect of bullying among minority youths should consider an intersectional approach that considers ethnic, gender, and sexual identities. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23597376/Intersecting_identities_and_the_association_between_bullying_and_suicide_attempt_among_New_York_city_youths:_results_from_the_2009_New_York_city_youth_risk_behavior_survey_ L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300994?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -