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Lifestyle-related factors, obesity, and incident microalbuminuria: the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study.
Am J Kidney Dis. 2013 Aug; 62(2):267-75.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Modifiable lifestyle-related factors are associated with risk of coronary heart disease and may also influence kidney disease risk.

STUDY DESIGN

Community-based prospective cohort study.

SETTING & PARTICIPANTS

2,354 African American and white participants aged 28-40 years without baseline microalbuminuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m² recruited from 4 US centers: Birmingham, AL; Chicago, IL; Minneapolis, MN; and Oakland, CA.

FACTORS

Current smoking, physical activity, fast food habits, obesity, and diet quality, which was based on 8 fundamental components of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, including increased intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, and nuts and legumes and reduced intake of sodium, sugar-sweetened beverages, and red and processed meats.

OUTCOMES & MEASUREMENTS

Spot urine albumin-creatinine ratios were obtained at baseline (1995-1996) and three 5-year follow-up examinations (5, 10, and 15 years' follow-up). Incident microalbuminuria was defined as the presence of age- and sex-adjusted albumin-creatinine ratio ≥25 mg/g at 2 or more of the successive follow-up examinations.

RESULTS

During the 15-year follow-up, 77 (3.3%) individuals developed incident microalbuminuria. After multivariable adjustment, poor diet quality (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4) and obesity (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.3) were associated significantly with microalbuminuria; current smoking (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9-2.8) was associated with microalbuminuria, although the CI crossed 1.0. Neither low physical activity (OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5-1.8) nor fast food consumption (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.7-2.3) was associated with microalbuminuria. Compared with individuals with no unhealthy lifestyle-related factors (poor diet quality, current smoking, and obesity), adjusted odds of incident microalbuminuria were 131%, 273%, and 634% higher for the presence of 1 (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3-4.3), 2 (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.8-7.7), and 3 (OR, 7.3; 95% CI, 2.1-26.1) unhealthy lifestyle-related factors.

LIMITATIONS

Self-reported dietary history and physical activity, low number of outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

Consuming an unhealthy diet and obesity are associated with incident microalbuminuria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. achang43@jhmi.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23601954

Citation

Chang, Alex, et al. "Lifestyle-related Factors, Obesity, and Incident Microalbuminuria: the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) Study." American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 62, no. 2, 2013, pp. 267-75.
Chang A, Van Horn L, Jacobs DR, et al. Lifestyle-related factors, obesity, and incident microalbuminuria: the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study. Am J Kidney Dis. 2013;62(2):267-75.
Chang, A., Van Horn, L., Jacobs, D. R., Liu, K., Muntner, P., Newsome, B., Shoham, D. A., Durazo-Arvizu, R., Bibbins-Domingo, K., Reis, J., & Kramer, H. (2013). Lifestyle-related factors, obesity, and incident microalbuminuria: the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study. American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, 62(2), 267-75. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2013.02.363
Chang A, et al. Lifestyle-related Factors, Obesity, and Incident Microalbuminuria: the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) Study. Am J Kidney Dis. 2013;62(2):267-75. PubMed PMID: 23601954.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lifestyle-related factors, obesity, and incident microalbuminuria: the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study. AU - Chang,Alex, AU - Van Horn,Linda, AU - Jacobs,David R,Jr AU - Liu,Kiang, AU - Muntner,Paul, AU - Newsome,Britt, AU - Shoham,David A, AU - Durazo-Arvizu,Ramon, AU - Bibbins-Domingo,Kirsten, AU - Reis,Jared, AU - Kramer,Holly, Y1 - 2013/04/17/ PY - 2012/09/01/received PY - 2013/02/05/accepted PY - 2013/4/23/entrez PY - 2013/4/23/pubmed PY - 2013/10/1/medline KW - DASH diet KW - kidney disease KW - lifestyle factors KW - microalbuminuria KW - obesity SP - 267 EP - 75 JF - American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation JO - Am J Kidney Dis VL - 62 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Modifiable lifestyle-related factors are associated with risk of coronary heart disease and may also influence kidney disease risk. STUDY DESIGN: Community-based prospective cohort study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 2,354 African American and white participants aged 28-40 years without baseline microalbuminuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m² recruited from 4 US centers: Birmingham, AL; Chicago, IL; Minneapolis, MN; and Oakland, CA. FACTORS: Current smoking, physical activity, fast food habits, obesity, and diet quality, which was based on 8 fundamental components of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, including increased intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, and nuts and legumes and reduced intake of sodium, sugar-sweetened beverages, and red and processed meats. OUTCOMES & MEASUREMENTS: Spot urine albumin-creatinine ratios were obtained at baseline (1995-1996) and three 5-year follow-up examinations (5, 10, and 15 years' follow-up). Incident microalbuminuria was defined as the presence of age- and sex-adjusted albumin-creatinine ratio ≥25 mg/g at 2 or more of the successive follow-up examinations. RESULTS: During the 15-year follow-up, 77 (3.3%) individuals developed incident microalbuminuria. After multivariable adjustment, poor diet quality (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4) and obesity (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.3) were associated significantly with microalbuminuria; current smoking (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9-2.8) was associated with microalbuminuria, although the CI crossed 1.0. Neither low physical activity (OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5-1.8) nor fast food consumption (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.7-2.3) was associated with microalbuminuria. Compared with individuals with no unhealthy lifestyle-related factors (poor diet quality, current smoking, and obesity), adjusted odds of incident microalbuminuria were 131%, 273%, and 634% higher for the presence of 1 (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3-4.3), 2 (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.8-7.7), and 3 (OR, 7.3; 95% CI, 2.1-26.1) unhealthy lifestyle-related factors. LIMITATIONS: Self-reported dietary history and physical activity, low number of outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Consuming an unhealthy diet and obesity are associated with incident microalbuminuria. SN - 1523-6838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23601954/Lifestyle_related_factors_obesity_and_incident_microalbuminuria:_the_CARDIA__Coronary_Artery_Risk_Development_in_Young_Adults__study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272-6386(13)00574-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -