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Effects of zinc supplementation on efficacy of antidepressant therapy, inflammatory cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with major depression.
Nutr Neurosci. 2014 Feb; 17(2):65-71.NN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Zinc is found in abundance in the human brain. Patients with depression may have decreased consumption of food sources rich in zinc, and zinc supplementation may have a potential influence on depressive symptoms. However, clinical trials on the effect of zinc supplementation in depression are limited. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of zinc supplementation on efficacy of antidepressant therapy. Furthermore, the effect of zinc on plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-a (BDNF-a) were assessed.

DESIGN

A single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of zinc supplementation was conducted in patients with DSM-IV major depression. Forty-four patients of both sexes aged 18-55 years were recruited for this study from a university hospital. The zinc-supplemented group received zinc sulfate (25 mg elemental Zn/day) orally in addition to their selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants for 12 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) on arrival, weeks 6 and 12. Plasma levels of IL-6, TNF-α and BDNF-a were measured at baseline and at the end of study.

RESULTS

Twenty patients in zinc group and 17 patients in placebo groups completed the study. At baseline, there were no significant differences in any variable between the patients allocated to receive placebo and those taking zinc supplement. Zinc supplementation significantly reduced HDRS compared to placebo (P < 0.01 at 12th week). No significant differences were observed in plasma levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and BDNF-a between zinc-supplemented and placebo-supplemented group.

CONCLUSION

Zinc supplementation in conjunction with antidepressant drugs might be beneficial for reducing depressive symptoms. However, its effect does not appear to be mediated through impact of zinc on inflammatory processes.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23602205

Citation

Ranjbar, Elham, et al. "Effects of Zinc Supplementation On Efficacy of Antidepressant Therapy, Inflammatory Cytokines, and Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Patients With Major Depression." Nutritional Neuroscience, vol. 17, no. 2, 2014, pp. 65-71.
Ranjbar E, Shams J, Sabetkasaei M, et al. Effects of zinc supplementation on efficacy of antidepressant therapy, inflammatory cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with major depression. Nutr Neurosci. 2014;17(2):65-71.
Ranjbar, E., Shams, J., Sabetkasaei, M., M-Shirazi, M., Rashidkhani, B., Mostafavi, A., Bornak, E., & Nasrollahzadeh, J. (2014). Effects of zinc supplementation on efficacy of antidepressant therapy, inflammatory cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with major depression. Nutritional Neuroscience, 17(2), 65-71. https://doi.org/10.1179/1476830513Y.0000000066
Ranjbar E, et al. Effects of Zinc Supplementation On Efficacy of Antidepressant Therapy, Inflammatory Cytokines, and Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Patients With Major Depression. Nutr Neurosci. 2014;17(2):65-71. PubMed PMID: 23602205.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of zinc supplementation on efficacy of antidepressant therapy, inflammatory cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with major depression. AU - Ranjbar,Elham, AU - Shams,Jamal, AU - Sabetkasaei,Masoumeh, AU - M-Shirazi,Minoo, AU - Rashidkhani,Bahram, AU - Mostafavi,Ali, AU - Bornak,Eiliyaz, AU - Nasrollahzadeh,Javad, Y1 - 2013/11/26/ PY - 2013/4/23/entrez PY - 2013/4/23/pubmed PY - 2014/9/16/medline KW - HDRS KW - Major depression KW - SSRI KW - Zinc SP - 65 EP - 71 JF - Nutritional neuroscience JO - Nutr Neurosci VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Zinc is found in abundance in the human brain. Patients with depression may have decreased consumption of food sources rich in zinc, and zinc supplementation may have a potential influence on depressive symptoms. However, clinical trials on the effect of zinc supplementation in depression are limited. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of zinc supplementation on efficacy of antidepressant therapy. Furthermore, the effect of zinc on plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-a (BDNF-a) were assessed. DESIGN: A single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of zinc supplementation was conducted in patients with DSM-IV major depression. Forty-four patients of both sexes aged 18-55 years were recruited for this study from a university hospital. The zinc-supplemented group received zinc sulfate (25 mg elemental Zn/day) orally in addition to their selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants for 12 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) on arrival, weeks 6 and 12. Plasma levels of IL-6, TNF-α and BDNF-a were measured at baseline and at the end of study. RESULTS: Twenty patients in zinc group and 17 patients in placebo groups completed the study. At baseline, there were no significant differences in any variable between the patients allocated to receive placebo and those taking zinc supplement. Zinc supplementation significantly reduced HDRS compared to placebo (P < 0.01 at 12th week). No significant differences were observed in plasma levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and BDNF-a between zinc-supplemented and placebo-supplemented group. CONCLUSION: Zinc supplementation in conjunction with antidepressant drugs might be beneficial for reducing depressive symptoms. However, its effect does not appear to be mediated through impact of zinc on inflammatory processes. SN - 1476-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23602205/Effects_of_zinc_supplementation_on_efficacy_of_antidepressant_therapy_inflammatory_cytokines_and_brain_derived_neurotrophic_factor_in_patients_with_major_depression_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/1476830513Y.0000000066 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -