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Role of Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Practice.
PharmaNutrition 2013; 1(2):41-49P

Abstract

Nutrition plays a minor role in psychiatric practice which is currently dominated by a pharmacological treatment algorithm. An accumulating body of evidence has implicated deficits in the dietary essential long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acids, eicosapenaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the pathophysiology of several major psychiatric disorders. LCn-3 fatty acids have an established long-term safety record in the general population, and existing evidence suggests that increasing LCn-3 fatty acid status may reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. LCn-3 fatty acid supplementation has been shown to augment the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant, mood-stabilizer, and second generation antipsychotic medications, and may additionally mitigate adverse cardiometabolic side-effects. Preliminary evidence also suggests that LCn-3 fatty acid supplementation may be efficacious as monotherapy for primary and early secondary prevention and for perinatal symptoms. The overall cost-benefit ratio endorses the incorporation of LCn-3 fatty acids into psychiatric treatment algorithms. The recent availability of laboratory facilities that specialize in determining blood LCn-3 fatty acid status and emerging evidence-based consensus guidelines regarding safe and efficacious LCn-3 fatty acid dose ranges provide the infrastructure necessary for implementation. This article outlines the rationale for incorporating LCn-3 fatty acid treatment into psychiatric practice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Division of Bipolar Disorders Research, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45219-0516.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23607087

Citation

McNamara, Robert K., and Jeffrey R. Strawn. "Role of Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Practice." PharmaNutrition, vol. 1, no. 2, 2013, pp. 41-49.
McNamara RK, Strawn JR. Role of Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Practice. PharmaNutrition. 2013;1(2):41-49.
McNamara, R. K., & Strawn, J. R. (2013). Role of Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Practice. PharmaNutrition, 1(2), pp. 41-49.
McNamara RK, Strawn JR. Role of Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Practice. PharmaNutrition. 2013;1(2):41-49. PubMed PMID: 23607087.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Psychiatric Practice. AU - McNamara,Robert K, AU - Strawn,Jeffrey R, PY - 2013/4/23/entrez PY - 2013/4/23/pubmed PY - 2013/4/23/medline KW - ADHD KW - Anxiety KW - Bipolar disorder KW - Cardiovascular disease KW - Clinical staging KW - Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) KW - Eicosapenaenoic acid (EPA) KW - Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids KW - Major depressive disorder KW - Primary prevention KW - Schizophrenia KW - Suicide SP - 41 EP - 49 JF - PharmaNutrition JO - PharmaNutrition VL - 1 IS - 2 N2 - Nutrition plays a minor role in psychiatric practice which is currently dominated by a pharmacological treatment algorithm. An accumulating body of evidence has implicated deficits in the dietary essential long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acids, eicosapenaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the pathophysiology of several major psychiatric disorders. LCn-3 fatty acids have an established long-term safety record in the general population, and existing evidence suggests that increasing LCn-3 fatty acid status may reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. LCn-3 fatty acid supplementation has been shown to augment the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant, mood-stabilizer, and second generation antipsychotic medications, and may additionally mitigate adverse cardiometabolic side-effects. Preliminary evidence also suggests that LCn-3 fatty acid supplementation may be efficacious as monotherapy for primary and early secondary prevention and for perinatal symptoms. The overall cost-benefit ratio endorses the incorporation of LCn-3 fatty acids into psychiatric treatment algorithms. The recent availability of laboratory facilities that specialize in determining blood LCn-3 fatty acid status and emerging evidence-based consensus guidelines regarding safe and efficacious LCn-3 fatty acid dose ranges provide the infrastructure necessary for implementation. This article outlines the rationale for incorporating LCn-3 fatty acid treatment into psychiatric practice. SN - 2213-4344 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23607087/Role_of_Long_Chain_Omega_3_Fatty_Acids_in_Psychiatric_Practice_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/23607087/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -