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Extending our knowledge of fermentable, short-chain carbohydrates for managing gastrointestinal symptoms.
Nutr Clin Pract. 2013 Jun; 28(3):300-6.NC

Abstract

The Monash University low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) diet is now accepted as an effective strategy for managing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in Australia, with interest expanding across the world. These poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates have been shown to induce IBS symptoms of diarrhea, bloating, abdominal pain, and flatus due to their poor absorption, osmotic activity, and rapid fermentation. Four clinical trials have been published to date, all with significant symptomatic response to the low FODMAP diet. Up to 86% of patients with IBS have achieved relief of overall gastrointestinal symptoms and, more specifically, bloating, flatus, abdominal pain, and altered bowel habit from the approach. This review provides an overview of the low FODMAP diet and summarizes the research to date, emerging concepts, and limitations. FODMAPs are known to be beneficial to bowel health; the importance of this and how this should be considered in the clinical management of IBS is also discussed. A clinical management flowchart is provided to assist nutrition professionals in the use of this approach.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Monash University, Central Clinical School, Melbourne, 3000 Australia. jacqueline.barrett@monash.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23614962

Citation

Barrett, Jacqueline S.. "Extending Our Knowledge of Fermentable, Short-chain Carbohydrates for Managing Gastrointestinal Symptoms." Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 28, no. 3, 2013, pp. 300-6.
Barrett JS. Extending our knowledge of fermentable, short-chain carbohydrates for managing gastrointestinal symptoms. Nutr Clin Pract. 2013;28(3):300-6.
Barrett, J. S. (2013). Extending our knowledge of fermentable, short-chain carbohydrates for managing gastrointestinal symptoms. Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 28(3), 300-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533613485790
Barrett JS. Extending Our Knowledge of Fermentable, Short-chain Carbohydrates for Managing Gastrointestinal Symptoms. Nutr Clin Pract. 2013;28(3):300-6. PubMed PMID: 23614962.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extending our knowledge of fermentable, short-chain carbohydrates for managing gastrointestinal symptoms. A1 - Barrett,Jacqueline S, Y1 - 2013/04/24/ PY - 2013/4/26/entrez PY - 2013/4/26/pubmed PY - 2014/1/7/medline KW - FODMAP KW - abdominal pain KW - carbohydrates KW - diarrhea KW - diet therapy KW - gastrointestinal diseases KW - irritable bowel syndrome SP - 300 EP - 6 JF - Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition JO - Nutr Clin Pract VL - 28 IS - 3 N2 - The Monash University low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) diet is now accepted as an effective strategy for managing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in Australia, with interest expanding across the world. These poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates have been shown to induce IBS symptoms of diarrhea, bloating, abdominal pain, and flatus due to their poor absorption, osmotic activity, and rapid fermentation. Four clinical trials have been published to date, all with significant symptomatic response to the low FODMAP diet. Up to 86% of patients with IBS have achieved relief of overall gastrointestinal symptoms and, more specifically, bloating, flatus, abdominal pain, and altered bowel habit from the approach. This review provides an overview of the low FODMAP diet and summarizes the research to date, emerging concepts, and limitations. FODMAPs are known to be beneficial to bowel health; the importance of this and how this should be considered in the clinical management of IBS is also discussed. A clinical management flowchart is provided to assist nutrition professionals in the use of this approach. SN - 1941-2452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23614962/Extending_our_knowledge_of_fermentable_short_chain_carbohydrates_for_managing_gastrointestinal_symptoms_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533613485790 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -