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Neuronal mechanisms and the treatment of motion sickness.
Pharmacology. 2013; 91(3-4):229-41.P

Abstract

The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the physiological basis, clinical picture and treatment options for motion sickness. Motion sickness is a well-known nausea and vomiting syndrome in otherwise healthy people. The physical signs of motion sickness occur in both humans and animals during travel by sea, automobile or airplane and in space. Furthermore, some other special situations, such as simulators, the cinema and video games, have been described as causing pseudomotion sickness. Children between 2 and 12 years old are most susceptible to motion sickness, and women are more frequently affected than men. Predisposing factors include menstruation, pregnancy, migraines and possibly a side difference in the mass of otoconia in the vestibular organs. Therapy is directed towards decreasing conflicting sensory input, accelerating the process of adaptation and controlling nausea and vomiting. To control these vegetative symptoms, scopolamine and antihistamines are the most effective drugs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, HNO-Zentrum Münsterland, Greven, Germany. schmael.hno@web.de

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23615033

Citation

Schmäl, F. "Neuronal Mechanisms and the Treatment of Motion Sickness." Pharmacology, vol. 91, no. 3-4, 2013, pp. 229-41.
Schmäl F. Neuronal mechanisms and the treatment of motion sickness. Pharmacology. 2013;91(3-4):229-41.
Schmäl, F. (2013). Neuronal mechanisms and the treatment of motion sickness. Pharmacology, 91(3-4), 229-41. https://doi.org/10.1159/000350185
Schmäl F. Neuronal Mechanisms and the Treatment of Motion Sickness. Pharmacology. 2013;91(3-4):229-41. PubMed PMID: 23615033.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuronal mechanisms and the treatment of motion sickness. A1 - Schmäl,F, Y1 - 2013/04/20/ PY - 2013/02/11/received PY - 2013/02/12/accepted PY - 2013/4/26/entrez PY - 2013/4/26/pubmed PY - 2013/12/18/medline SP - 229 EP - 41 JF - Pharmacology JO - Pharmacology VL - 91 IS - 3-4 N2 - The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the physiological basis, clinical picture and treatment options for motion sickness. Motion sickness is a well-known nausea and vomiting syndrome in otherwise healthy people. The physical signs of motion sickness occur in both humans and animals during travel by sea, automobile or airplane and in space. Furthermore, some other special situations, such as simulators, the cinema and video games, have been described as causing pseudomotion sickness. Children between 2 and 12 years old are most susceptible to motion sickness, and women are more frequently affected than men. Predisposing factors include menstruation, pregnancy, migraines and possibly a side difference in the mass of otoconia in the vestibular organs. Therapy is directed towards decreasing conflicting sensory input, accelerating the process of adaptation and controlling nausea and vomiting. To control these vegetative symptoms, scopolamine and antihistamines are the most effective drugs. SN - 1423-0313 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23615033/full_citation L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000350185 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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