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Long-term alcohol and caffeine intake and risk of sudden cardiac death in women.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jun; 97(6):1356-63.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol and caffeine intakes may play a role in the development of sudden cardiac death (SCD) because of their effects on cholesterol, blood pressure, heart rate variability, and inflammation.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to examine the association between long-term alcohol and caffeine intakes and risk of SCD in women.

DESIGN

We examined 93,676 postmenopausal women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Women were enrolled between 1993 and 1998 and were followed until August 2009. Women completed a food-frequency questionnaire at baseline and again at year 3. We modeled exposure to alcohol 3 ways: by using baseline intake only, a cumulative average of baseline and year 3 intake, and the most recent reported intake (a simple time-varying analysis).

RESULTS

Intake of 5-15 g alcohol/d (about one drink) was associated with a nonsignificantly reduced risk of SCD compared with 0.1-5 g/d of baseline intake (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.40, 1.02), of cumulative average intake (HR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.43, 1.11), and of most recent intake (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.96), with adjustment for age, race, income, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, hormone use, and total energy. No association was found between SCD and total caffeine intake (mg/d) or cups of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeinated tea.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that about one drink per day (or 5.1-15 g/d) may be associated with a reduced risk of SCD in this population; however, this association was only statistically significant for a model using the most recent alcohol intake. Total caffeine, regular coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and regular tea intake were not associated with the risk of SCD. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000611.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. mbertoia@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23615825

Citation

Bertoia, Monica L., et al. "Long-term Alcohol and Caffeine Intake and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 97, no. 6, 2013, pp. 1356-63.
Bertoia ML, Triche EW, Michaud DS, et al. Long-term alcohol and caffeine intake and risk of sudden cardiac death in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013;97(6):1356-63.
Bertoia, M. L., Triche, E. W., Michaud, D. S., Baylin, A., Hogan, J. W., Neuhouser, M. L., Freiberg, M. S., Allison, M. A., Safford, M. M., Li, W., Mossavar-Rahmani, Y., Rosal, M. C., & Eaton, C. B. (2013). Long-term alcohol and caffeine intake and risk of sudden cardiac death in women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 97(6), 1356-63. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.112.044248
Bertoia ML, et al. Long-term Alcohol and Caffeine Intake and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013;97(6):1356-63. PubMed PMID: 23615825.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term alcohol and caffeine intake and risk of sudden cardiac death in women. AU - Bertoia,Monica L, AU - Triche,Elizabeth W, AU - Michaud,Dominique S, AU - Baylin,Ana, AU - Hogan,Joseph W, AU - Neuhouser,Marian L, AU - Freiberg,Matthew S, AU - Allison,Matthew A, AU - Safford,Monika M, AU - Li,Wenjun, AU - Mossavar-Rahmani,Yasmin, AU - Rosal,Milagros C, AU - Eaton,Charles B, Y1 - 2013/04/24/ PY - 2013/4/26/entrez PY - 2013/4/26/pubmed PY - 2013/7/17/medline SP - 1356 EP - 63 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 97 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alcohol and caffeine intakes may play a role in the development of sudden cardiac death (SCD) because of their effects on cholesterol, blood pressure, heart rate variability, and inflammation. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the association between long-term alcohol and caffeine intakes and risk of SCD in women. DESIGN: We examined 93,676 postmenopausal women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Women were enrolled between 1993 and 1998 and were followed until August 2009. Women completed a food-frequency questionnaire at baseline and again at year 3. We modeled exposure to alcohol 3 ways: by using baseline intake only, a cumulative average of baseline and year 3 intake, and the most recent reported intake (a simple time-varying analysis). RESULTS: Intake of 5-15 g alcohol/d (about one drink) was associated with a nonsignificantly reduced risk of SCD compared with 0.1-5 g/d of baseline intake (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.40, 1.02), of cumulative average intake (HR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.43, 1.11), and of most recent intake (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.96), with adjustment for age, race, income, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, hormone use, and total energy. No association was found between SCD and total caffeine intake (mg/d) or cups of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and caffeinated tea. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that about one drink per day (or 5.1-15 g/d) may be associated with a reduced risk of SCD in this population; however, this association was only statistically significant for a model using the most recent alcohol intake. Total caffeine, regular coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and regular tea intake were not associated with the risk of SCD. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000611. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23615825/Long_term_alcohol_and_caffeine_intake_and_risk_of_sudden_cardiac_death_in_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.112.044248 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -