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Acute consumption of walnuts and walnut components differentially affect postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and cholesterol efflux in humans with mild hypercholesterolemia.
J Nutr. 2013 Jun; 143(6):788-94.JN

Abstract

Walnut consumption improves cardiovascular disease risk; however, to our knowledge, the contribution of individual walnut components has not been assessed. This study evaluated the acute consumption of whole walnuts (85 g), separated nut skins (5.6 g), de-fatted nutmeat (34 g), and nut oil (51 g) on postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, and oxidative stress. Cholesterol efflux (ex vivo) was assessed in the whole walnut treatment only. A randomized, 4-period, crossover trial was conducted in healthy overweight and obese adults (n = 15) with moderate hypercholesterolemia. There was a treatment × time point interaction for triglycerides (P < 0.01) and increased postprandial concentrations were observed for the oil and whole walnut treatments (P < 0.01). Walnut skins decreased the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) compared with baseline (P = 0.02) such that a difference persisted between the skin and oil treatments (P = 0.01). The Framingham RHI was maintained with the oil treatment compared with the skins and whole nut (P < 0.05). There was a treatment effect for the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) (P < 0.01), and mean FRAP was greater with the oil and skin treatments compared with the nutmeat (P < 0.01). Cholesterol efflux increased by 3.3% following whole walnut consumption in J774 cells cultured with postprandial serum compared with fasting baseline (P = 0.02). Walnut oil favorably affected endothelial function and whole walnuts increased cholesterol efflux. These 2 novel mechanisms may explain in part the cardiovascular benefits of walnuts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23616506

Citation

Berryman, Claire E., et al. "Acute Consumption of Walnuts and Walnut Components Differentially Affect Postprandial Lipemia, Endothelial Function, Oxidative Stress, and Cholesterol Efflux in Humans With Mild Hypercholesterolemia." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 6, 2013, pp. 788-94.
Berryman CE, Grieger JA, West SG, et al. Acute consumption of walnuts and walnut components differentially affect postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and cholesterol efflux in humans with mild hypercholesterolemia. J Nutr. 2013;143(6):788-94.
Berryman, C. E., Grieger, J. A., West, S. G., Chen, C. Y., Blumberg, J. B., Rothblat, G. H., Sankaranarayanan, S., & Kris-Etherton, P. M. (2013). Acute consumption of walnuts and walnut components differentially affect postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and cholesterol efflux in humans with mild hypercholesterolemia. The Journal of Nutrition, 143(6), 788-94. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.112.170993
Berryman CE, et al. Acute Consumption of Walnuts and Walnut Components Differentially Affect Postprandial Lipemia, Endothelial Function, Oxidative Stress, and Cholesterol Efflux in Humans With Mild Hypercholesterolemia. J Nutr. 2013;143(6):788-94. PubMed PMID: 23616506.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute consumption of walnuts and walnut components differentially affect postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and cholesterol efflux in humans with mild hypercholesterolemia. AU - Berryman,Claire E, AU - Grieger,Jessica A, AU - West,Sheila G, AU - Chen,Chung-Yen O, AU - Blumberg,Jeffrey B, AU - Rothblat,George H, AU - Sankaranarayanan,Sandhya, AU - Kris-Etherton,Penny M, Y1 - 2013/04/24/ PY - 2013/4/26/entrez PY - 2013/4/26/pubmed PY - 2013/7/23/medline SP - 788 EP - 94 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 143 IS - 6 N2 - Walnut consumption improves cardiovascular disease risk; however, to our knowledge, the contribution of individual walnut components has not been assessed. This study evaluated the acute consumption of whole walnuts (85 g), separated nut skins (5.6 g), de-fatted nutmeat (34 g), and nut oil (51 g) on postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, and oxidative stress. Cholesterol efflux (ex vivo) was assessed in the whole walnut treatment only. A randomized, 4-period, crossover trial was conducted in healthy overweight and obese adults (n = 15) with moderate hypercholesterolemia. There was a treatment × time point interaction for triglycerides (P < 0.01) and increased postprandial concentrations were observed for the oil and whole walnut treatments (P < 0.01). Walnut skins decreased the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) compared with baseline (P = 0.02) such that a difference persisted between the skin and oil treatments (P = 0.01). The Framingham RHI was maintained with the oil treatment compared with the skins and whole nut (P < 0.05). There was a treatment effect for the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) (P < 0.01), and mean FRAP was greater with the oil and skin treatments compared with the nutmeat (P < 0.01). Cholesterol efflux increased by 3.3% following whole walnut consumption in J774 cells cultured with postprandial serum compared with fasting baseline (P = 0.02). Walnut oil favorably affected endothelial function and whole walnuts increased cholesterol efflux. These 2 novel mechanisms may explain in part the cardiovascular benefits of walnuts. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23616506/Acute_consumption_of_walnuts_and_walnut_components_differentially_affect_postprandial_lipemia_endothelial_function_oxidative_stress_and_cholesterol_efflux_in_humans_with_mild_hypercholesterolemia_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.112.170993 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -