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Self-reported family history of leiomyoma: not a reliable marker of high risk.
Ann Epidemiol 2013; 23(5):286-90AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To examine the importance of self-reported family history of uterine leiomyoma (fibroids) as a marker of risk.

METHODS

Women, aged 35 to 49, were randomly selected from the membership of a large, urban health plan. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire about family history of fibroids. Ultrasound screening for fibroids followed, regardless of whether participants had been previously diagnosed (660 black, 412 white). Data for each ethnic group were analyzed separately using Poisson regression.

RESULTS

In both ethnic groups, women who reported a family history of fibroids had an elevated risk of fibroids compared with those without family history. However, no elevated risk was apparent for cases who did not know they had fibroids when they reported the family history information.

CONCLUSIONS

Many women may first learn about their family history of fibroids when discussing their own clinical diagnosis with family members. Such bias would invalidate self-reported family history as a predictor of fibroid risk. As new pharmacologic treatments for fibroids are developed, women at high risk of fibroids would benefit from early screening and pharmacologic treatment to delay development of large fibroids and reduce the need for invasive treatments. Self-reported family history is not useful for identifying high-risk women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Social & Scientific Systems, Inc., Durham, NC, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23621994

Citation

Saldana, Tina Marie, et al. "Self-reported Family History of Leiomyoma: Not a Reliable Marker of High Risk." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 23, no. 5, 2013, pp. 286-90.
Saldana TM, Moshesh M, Baird DD. Self-reported family history of leiomyoma: not a reliable marker of high risk. Ann Epidemiol. 2013;23(5):286-90.
Saldana, T. M., Moshesh, M., & Baird, D. D. (2013). Self-reported family history of leiomyoma: not a reliable marker of high risk. Annals of Epidemiology, 23(5), pp. 286-90. doi:10.1016/j.annepidem.2013.03.003.
Saldana TM, Moshesh M, Baird DD. Self-reported Family History of Leiomyoma: Not a Reliable Marker of High Risk. Ann Epidemiol. 2013;23(5):286-90. PubMed PMID: 23621994.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported family history of leiomyoma: not a reliable marker of high risk. AU - Saldana,Tina Marie, AU - Moshesh,Malana, AU - Baird,Donna Day, PY - 2012/12/05/received PY - 2013/02/15/revised PY - 2013/03/06/accepted PY - 2013/4/30/entrez PY - 2013/4/30/pubmed PY - 2013/9/26/medline SP - 286 EP - 90 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To examine the importance of self-reported family history of uterine leiomyoma (fibroids) as a marker of risk. METHODS: Women, aged 35 to 49, were randomly selected from the membership of a large, urban health plan. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire about family history of fibroids. Ultrasound screening for fibroids followed, regardless of whether participants had been previously diagnosed (660 black, 412 white). Data for each ethnic group were analyzed separately using Poisson regression. RESULTS: In both ethnic groups, women who reported a family history of fibroids had an elevated risk of fibroids compared with those without family history. However, no elevated risk was apparent for cases who did not know they had fibroids when they reported the family history information. CONCLUSIONS: Many women may first learn about their family history of fibroids when discussing their own clinical diagnosis with family members. Such bias would invalidate self-reported family history as a predictor of fibroid risk. As new pharmacologic treatments for fibroids are developed, women at high risk of fibroids would benefit from early screening and pharmacologic treatment to delay development of large fibroids and reduce the need for invasive treatments. Self-reported family history is not useful for identifying high-risk women. SN - 1873-2585 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23621994/Self_reported_family_history_of_leiomyoma:_not_a_reliable_marker_of_high_risk_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(13)00057-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -