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Favourable outcome in a patient bitten by a rabid bat infected with the European bat lyssavirus-1.
Acta Clin Belg. 2013 Jan-Feb; 68(1):54-8.AC

Abstract

The classic rabies virus (genotype 1) has been eliminated in Western Europe, but related lyssaviruses still circulate in local bats. In August 2010, a Belgian photographer was bitten upon provocation of a disoriented Eptesicus serotinus bat in Spain. The bat was infected with European bat lyssavirus-1 (genotype 5). The isolate proved highly neurovirulent in mice. The patient had received preventive rabies immunisations years before the incident and received two boosters with the HDCV rabies vaccine afterwards. Available vaccines are based on the classic rabies virus, which is significantly divergent from the European bat lyssavirus-1. Fortunately, the patient's serological immune response demonstrated satisfactory neutralisation of the 2010 EBLV-1 isolate, using an intracerebral challenge model in mice. Most likely, the patient's life was saved thanks to vaccination with the classic rabies vaccine, which proved sufficiently protective against European bat lyssavirus-1. This case highlights the need for preventive rabies vaccination in people, who come in contact with bats and to seek medical council after a scratch or bite from a bat.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Reference Centre of Rabies, Viral Diseases, Communicable and Infectious Diseases, Scientific Institute of Public Health (WIV-ISP), Brussels, Belgium. steven.vangucht@wiv-isp.beNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23627196

Citation

Van Gucht, S, et al. "Favourable Outcome in a Patient Bitten By a Rabid Bat Infected With the European Bat Lyssavirus-1." Acta Clinica Belgica, vol. 68, no. 1, 2013, pp. 54-8.
Van Gucht S, Verlinde R, Colyn J, et al. Favourable outcome in a patient bitten by a rabid bat infected with the European bat lyssavirus-1. Acta Clin Belg. 2013;68(1):54-8.
Van Gucht, S., Verlinde, R., Colyn, J., Vanderpas, J., Vanhoof, R., Roels, S., Francart, A., Brochier, B., & Suin, V. (2013). Favourable outcome in a patient bitten by a rabid bat infected with the European bat lyssavirus-1. Acta Clinica Belgica, 68(1), 54-8.
Van Gucht S, et al. Favourable Outcome in a Patient Bitten By a Rabid Bat Infected With the European Bat Lyssavirus-1. Acta Clin Belg. 2013 Jan-Feb;68(1):54-8. PubMed PMID: 23627196.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Favourable outcome in a patient bitten by a rabid bat infected with the European bat lyssavirus-1. AU - Van Gucht,S, AU - Verlinde,R, AU - Colyn,J, AU - Vanderpas,J, AU - Vanhoof,R, AU - Roels,S, AU - Francart,A, AU - Brochier,B, AU - Suin,V, PY - 2013/5/1/entrez PY - 2013/5/1/pubmed PY - 2013/7/3/medline SP - 54 EP - 8 JF - Acta clinica Belgica JO - Acta Clin Belg VL - 68 IS - 1 N2 - The classic rabies virus (genotype 1) has been eliminated in Western Europe, but related lyssaviruses still circulate in local bats. In August 2010, a Belgian photographer was bitten upon provocation of a disoriented Eptesicus serotinus bat in Spain. The bat was infected with European bat lyssavirus-1 (genotype 5). The isolate proved highly neurovirulent in mice. The patient had received preventive rabies immunisations years before the incident and received two boosters with the HDCV rabies vaccine afterwards. Available vaccines are based on the classic rabies virus, which is significantly divergent from the European bat lyssavirus-1. Fortunately, the patient's serological immune response demonstrated satisfactory neutralisation of the 2010 EBLV-1 isolate, using an intracerebral challenge model in mice. Most likely, the patient's life was saved thanks to vaccination with the classic rabies vaccine, which proved sufficiently protective against European bat lyssavirus-1. This case highlights the need for preventive rabies vaccination in people, who come in contact with bats and to seek medical council after a scratch or bite from a bat. SN - 1784-3286 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23627196/Favourable_outcome_in_a_patient_bitten_by_a_rabid_bat_infected_with_the_European_bat_lyssavirus_1_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.2143/ACB.68.1.2062721 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -