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End of the century pCO₂ levels do not impact calcification in Mediterranean cold-water corals.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(4):e62655.Plos

Abstract

Ocean acidification caused by anthropogenic uptake of CO₂ is perceived to be a major threat to calcifying organisms. Cold-water corals were thought to be strongly affected by a decrease in ocean pH due to their abundance in deep and cold waters which, in contrast to tropical coral reef waters, will soon become corrosive to calcium carbonate. Calcification rates of two Mediterranean cold-water coral species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, were measured under variable partial pressure of CO₂ (pCO₂) that ranged between 380 µatm for present-day conditions and 930 µatm for the end of the century. The present study addressed both short- and long-term responses by repeatedly determining calcification rates on the same specimens over a period of 9 months. Besides studying the direct, short-term response to elevated pCO₂ levels, the study aimed to elucidate the potential for acclimation of calcification of cold-water corals to ocean acidification. Net calcification of both species was unaffected by the levels of pCO₂ investigated and revealed no short-term shock and, therefore, no long-term acclimation in calcification to changes in the carbonate chemistry. There was an effect of time during repeated experiments with increasing net calcification rates for both species, however, as this pattern was found in all treatments, there is no indication that acclimation of calcification to ocean acidification occurred. The use of controls (initial and ambient net calcification rates) indicated that this increase was not caused by acclimation in calcification response to higher pCO₂. An extrapolation of these data suggests that calcification of these two cold-water corals will not be affected by the pCO₂ level projected at the end of the century.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-mer, France. maier.conny@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23646133

Citation

Maier, Cornelia, et al. "End of the Century pCO₂ Levels Do Not Impact Calcification in Mediterranean Cold-water Corals." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 4, 2013, pp. e62655.
Maier C, Schubert A, Berzunza Sànchez MM, et al. End of the century pCO₂ levels do not impact calcification in Mediterranean cold-water corals. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(4):e62655.
Maier, C., Schubert, A., Berzunza Sànchez, M. M., Weinbauer, M. G., Watremez, P., & Gattuso, J. P. (2013). End of the century pCO₂ levels do not impact calcification in Mediterranean cold-water corals. PloS One, 8(4), e62655. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0062655
Maier C, et al. End of the Century pCO₂ Levels Do Not Impact Calcification in Mediterranean Cold-water Corals. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(4):e62655. PubMed PMID: 23646133.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - End of the century pCO₂ levels do not impact calcification in Mediterranean cold-water corals. AU - Maier,Cornelia, AU - Schubert,Alexander, AU - Berzunza Sànchez,Maria M, AU - Weinbauer,Markus G, AU - Watremez,Pierre, AU - Gattuso,Jean-Pierre, Y1 - 2013/04/30/ PY - 2012/10/03/received PY - 2013/03/24/accepted PY - 2013/5/7/entrez PY - 2013/5/7/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline SP - e62655 EP - e62655 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - Ocean acidification caused by anthropogenic uptake of CO₂ is perceived to be a major threat to calcifying organisms. Cold-water corals were thought to be strongly affected by a decrease in ocean pH due to their abundance in deep and cold waters which, in contrast to tropical coral reef waters, will soon become corrosive to calcium carbonate. Calcification rates of two Mediterranean cold-water coral species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, were measured under variable partial pressure of CO₂ (pCO₂) that ranged between 380 µatm for present-day conditions and 930 µatm for the end of the century. The present study addressed both short- and long-term responses by repeatedly determining calcification rates on the same specimens over a period of 9 months. Besides studying the direct, short-term response to elevated pCO₂ levels, the study aimed to elucidate the potential for acclimation of calcification of cold-water corals to ocean acidification. Net calcification of both species was unaffected by the levels of pCO₂ investigated and revealed no short-term shock and, therefore, no long-term acclimation in calcification to changes in the carbonate chemistry. There was an effect of time during repeated experiments with increasing net calcification rates for both species, however, as this pattern was found in all treatments, there is no indication that acclimation of calcification to ocean acidification occurred. The use of controls (initial and ambient net calcification rates) indicated that this increase was not caused by acclimation in calcification response to higher pCO₂. An extrapolation of these data suggests that calcification of these two cold-water corals will not be affected by the pCO₂ level projected at the end of the century. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23646133/End_of_the_century_pCO₂_levels_do_not_impact_calcification_in_Mediterranean_cold_water_corals_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0062655 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -