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Trehalases: a neglected carbon metabolism regulator?
Plant Signal Behav. 2013 Jul; 8(7):e24778.PS

Abstract

Trehalases are enzymes that carry out the degradation of the non-reducing disaccharide trehalose. Trehalase phylogeny unveiled three major branches comprising those from bacteria; plant and animals; and those from fungal origin. Comparative analysis between several deduced trehalase structures and the crystallographic structure of bacterial trehalase indicated that these enzyme's structures are highly conserved in spite of the marked differences found at the sequence level. These results suggest a bacterial origin for the trehalases in contrast to an eukaryotic origin, as previously proposed. Trehalases structural analysis showed that they contain six discrete motifs which are characteristic of each phylogenetic group, suggesting a positive evolutionary selection pressure for the structural conservation. Interestingly, trehalases are involved in multiple regulatory functions: In the response against pathogens (plant-pathogen interactions); the regulation of bacterial viability in symbiotic interactions (legume-Rhizobium); carbon partitioning in plants; regulating chitin biosynthesis, as well as energy supply in the hemolymph for flight, in insects. In summary, trehalases seem to have a prokaryotic origin and play an active role in carbon metabolism and other diverse regulatory effects on cell physiology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Biología Molecular de Plantas; Instituto de Biotecnología/Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México; Cuernavaca, Morelos, México.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23656873

Citation

Barraza, Aarón, and Federico Sánchez. "Trehalases: a Neglected Carbon Metabolism Regulator?" Plant Signaling & Behavior, vol. 8, no. 7, 2013, pp. e24778.
Barraza A, Sánchez F. Trehalases: a neglected carbon metabolism regulator? Plant Signal Behav. 2013;8(7):e24778.
Barraza, A., & Sánchez, F. (2013). Trehalases: a neglected carbon metabolism regulator? Plant Signaling & Behavior, 8(7), e24778. https://doi.org/10.4161/psb.24778
Barraza A, Sánchez F. Trehalases: a Neglected Carbon Metabolism Regulator. Plant Signal Behav. 2013;8(7):e24778. PubMed PMID: 23656873.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trehalases: a neglected carbon metabolism regulator? AU - Barraza,Aarón, AU - Sánchez,Federico, Y1 - 2013/05/01/ PY - 2013/5/10/entrez PY - 2013/5/10/pubmed PY - 2014/7/6/medline KW - Trehalases KW - carbon-metabolism KW - structural conservation and distribution SP - e24778 EP - e24778 JF - Plant signaling & behavior JO - Plant Signal Behav VL - 8 IS - 7 N2 - Trehalases are enzymes that carry out the degradation of the non-reducing disaccharide trehalose. Trehalase phylogeny unveiled three major branches comprising those from bacteria; plant and animals; and those from fungal origin. Comparative analysis between several deduced trehalase structures and the crystallographic structure of bacterial trehalase indicated that these enzyme's structures are highly conserved in spite of the marked differences found at the sequence level. These results suggest a bacterial origin for the trehalases in contrast to an eukaryotic origin, as previously proposed. Trehalases structural analysis showed that they contain six discrete motifs which are characteristic of each phylogenetic group, suggesting a positive evolutionary selection pressure for the structural conservation. Interestingly, trehalases are involved in multiple regulatory functions: In the response against pathogens (plant-pathogen interactions); the regulation of bacterial viability in symbiotic interactions (legume-Rhizobium); carbon partitioning in plants; regulating chitin biosynthesis, as well as energy supply in the hemolymph for flight, in insects. In summary, trehalases seem to have a prokaryotic origin and play an active role in carbon metabolism and other diverse regulatory effects on cell physiology. SN - 1559-2324 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23656873/Trehalases:_a_neglected_carbon_metabolism_regulator L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.4161/psb.24778 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -