Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effects of dietary L-carnitine and dried distillers grains with solubles on growth, carcass characteristics, and loin and fat quality of growing-finishing pigs.
J Anim Sci. 2013 Jul; 91(7):3211-9.JA

Abstract

A total of 1104 barrows and gilts (PIC 337 × 1050, Pig Improvement Company, Hendersonville, TN), weighing 36 ± 1 kg were used in a 109-d study to evaluate effects of dietary L-carnitine and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth, carcass traits, and loin and fat quality. Pigs were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments, with 7 pens per treatment. Treatments were arranged as a 2 × 3 factorial, with main effects of DDGS (30% in Phases 1, 2, and 3, and 20% in Phase 4) and L-carnitine (0, 50, or 100 mg/kg). Overall (d 0 to 109), dietary L-carnitine tended to improve ADG (linear, P = 0.07). Pigs fed 50 mg/kg L-carnitine but no DDGS had greater G:F than pigs fed 0 or 100 mg/kg, whereas when diets containing DDGS were fed, 50 mg/kg of L-carnitine reduced G:F compared with pigs fed 0 or 100 mg/kg (quadratic DDGS × L-carnitine, P < 0.01). There was no effect of DDGS × L-carnitine for any carcass traits, but pigs fed increasing dietary inclusion levels of L-carnitine produced heavier HCW (quadratic, P = 0.03), greater carcass yields (quadratic, P = 0.07), and greater fat depths (quadratic, P = 0.04), with the greatest response observed in pigs fed 50 mg/kg dietary L-carnitine. Feeding L-carnitine increased purge loss (linear, P = 0.03), whereas feeding DDGS tended to decrease (P = 0.06) LM marbling scores. The LM from pigs fed 50 mg/kg L-carnitine and DDGS had lower shear force values compared with LM chops from pigs fed either 0 or 100 mg/kg; however, shear force values were similar across dietary L-carnitine levels in diets devoid of DDGS (quadratic DDGS × L-carnitine, P < 0.01). Furthermore, increasing L-carnitine in DDGS diets increased fresh LM color scores, but pigs fed DDGS-free diets produced LM chops with similar subjective color scores (linear DDGS × L-carnitine, P = 0.03). As expected, feeding DDGS increased (P < 0.001) iodine value (IV) in jowl fat samples, but dietary L-carnitine did not alter IV. The concentrations of C18:2n-6 and C20:2 were decreased with increasing L-carnitine in DDGS-containing diets, but not in diets without DDGS (linear DDGS × L-carnitine, P ≤ 0.04). Results of this study indicate that dietary DDGS did not affect growth, but led to more unsaturation of jowl fat, whereas feeding 50 mg/kg of L-carnitine improved HCW and reduced C18:2n-6 in jowl fat when fed in combination with DDGS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, College of Agriculture, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-0201, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23658353

Citation

Ying, W, et al. "Effects of Dietary L-carnitine and Dried Distillers Grains With Solubles On Growth, Carcass Characteristics, and Loin and Fat Quality of Growing-finishing Pigs." Journal of Animal Science, vol. 91, no. 7, 2013, pp. 3211-9.
Ying W, Tokach MD, DeRouchey JM, et al. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and dried distillers grains with solubles on growth, carcass characteristics, and loin and fat quality of growing-finishing pigs. J Anim Sci. 2013;91(7):3211-9.
Ying, W., Tokach, M. D., DeRouchey, J. M., Houser, T. E., Dritz, S. S., Goodband, R. D., & Nelssen, J. L. (2013). Effects of dietary L-carnitine and dried distillers grains with solubles on growth, carcass characteristics, and loin and fat quality of growing-finishing pigs. Journal of Animal Science, 91(7), 3211-9. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas.2012-5606
Ying W, et al. Effects of Dietary L-carnitine and Dried Distillers Grains With Solubles On Growth, Carcass Characteristics, and Loin and Fat Quality of Growing-finishing Pigs. J Anim Sci. 2013;91(7):3211-9. PubMed PMID: 23658353.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of dietary L-carnitine and dried distillers grains with solubles on growth, carcass characteristics, and loin and fat quality of growing-finishing pigs. AU - Ying,W, AU - Tokach,M D, AU - DeRouchey,J M, AU - Houser,T E, AU - Dritz,S S, AU - Goodband,R D, AU - Nelssen,J L, Y1 - 2013/05/08/ PY - 2013/5/10/entrez PY - 2013/5/10/pubmed PY - 2014/2/20/medline SP - 3211 EP - 9 JF - Journal of animal science JO - J Anim Sci VL - 91 IS - 7 N2 - A total of 1104 barrows and gilts (PIC 337 × 1050, Pig Improvement Company, Hendersonville, TN), weighing 36 ± 1 kg were used in a 109-d study to evaluate effects of dietary L-carnitine and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth, carcass traits, and loin and fat quality. Pigs were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments, with 7 pens per treatment. Treatments were arranged as a 2 × 3 factorial, with main effects of DDGS (30% in Phases 1, 2, and 3, and 20% in Phase 4) and L-carnitine (0, 50, or 100 mg/kg). Overall (d 0 to 109), dietary L-carnitine tended to improve ADG (linear, P = 0.07). Pigs fed 50 mg/kg L-carnitine but no DDGS had greater G:F than pigs fed 0 or 100 mg/kg, whereas when diets containing DDGS were fed, 50 mg/kg of L-carnitine reduced G:F compared with pigs fed 0 or 100 mg/kg (quadratic DDGS × L-carnitine, P < 0.01). There was no effect of DDGS × L-carnitine for any carcass traits, but pigs fed increasing dietary inclusion levels of L-carnitine produced heavier HCW (quadratic, P = 0.03), greater carcass yields (quadratic, P = 0.07), and greater fat depths (quadratic, P = 0.04), with the greatest response observed in pigs fed 50 mg/kg dietary L-carnitine. Feeding L-carnitine increased purge loss (linear, P = 0.03), whereas feeding DDGS tended to decrease (P = 0.06) LM marbling scores. The LM from pigs fed 50 mg/kg L-carnitine and DDGS had lower shear force values compared with LM chops from pigs fed either 0 or 100 mg/kg; however, shear force values were similar across dietary L-carnitine levels in diets devoid of DDGS (quadratic DDGS × L-carnitine, P < 0.01). Furthermore, increasing L-carnitine in DDGS diets increased fresh LM color scores, but pigs fed DDGS-free diets produced LM chops with similar subjective color scores (linear DDGS × L-carnitine, P = 0.03). As expected, feeding DDGS increased (P < 0.001) iodine value (IV) in jowl fat samples, but dietary L-carnitine did not alter IV. The concentrations of C18:2n-6 and C20:2 were decreased with increasing L-carnitine in DDGS-containing diets, but not in diets without DDGS (linear DDGS × L-carnitine, P ≤ 0.04). Results of this study indicate that dietary DDGS did not affect growth, but led to more unsaturation of jowl fat, whereas feeding 50 mg/kg of L-carnitine improved HCW and reduced C18:2n-6 in jowl fat when fed in combination with DDGS. SN - 1525-3163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23658353/Effects_of_dietary_L_carnitine_and_dried_distillers_grains_with_solubles_on_growth_carcass_characteristics_and_loin_and_fat_quality_of_growing_finishing_pigs_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jas/article-lookup/doi/10.2527/jas.2012-5606 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -