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Dentists' skills with fearful patients: education and treatment.
Eur J Oral Sci. 2013 Jun; 121(3 Pt 2):283-91.EJ

Abstract

The aims were to explore dentists' skills in dental fear, current strategies when treating fearful adult patients, and the possible need for additional education among dentists working in Sweden. A sample of 1,293 members of the Association of Public Health Dentists in Sweden were asked to respond to a Web survey concerning dental fear. The response rate was 69% (n = 889); 91% trained in Sweden and 9% trained in another country. The most frequently used pharmacological anxiety-reducing techniques were medication with a midazolame mixture (72%) and benzodiazepine tablets (77%), and the most commonly used psychological techniques were relaxation (68%), distraction (66%), and Tell-Show-Do (86%). A larger proportion of dentists trained in Sweden, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries, reported that they had received undergraduate training in dental fear. Dentists trained in Sweden more often reported competence in pharmacological and psychological anxiety-reducing techniques, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries. Higher levels of self-rated efficacy in treating fearful patients accompanied additional education in dental fear after graduation. In conclusion, Swedish dentists use a variety of techniques to meet the needs of fearful dental patients. Competence in anxiety-reducing techniques is associated with self-efficacy and the site of education.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Behavioural and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. carl-otto.brahm@lj.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23659263

Citation

Brahm, Carl-Otto, et al. "Dentists' Skills With Fearful Patients: Education and Treatment." European Journal of Oral Sciences, vol. 121, no. 3 Pt 2, 2013, pp. 283-91.
Brahm CO, Lundgren J, Carlsson SG, et al. Dentists' skills with fearful patients: education and treatment. Eur J Oral Sci. 2013;121(3 Pt 2):283-91.
Brahm, C. O., Lundgren, J., Carlsson, S. G., Nilsson, P., Hultqvist, J., & Hägglin, C. (2013). Dentists' skills with fearful patients: education and treatment. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 121(3 Pt 2), 283-91. https://doi.org/10.1111/eos.12017
Brahm CO, et al. Dentists' Skills With Fearful Patients: Education and Treatment. Eur J Oral Sci. 2013;121(3 Pt 2):283-91. PubMed PMID: 23659263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dentists' skills with fearful patients: education and treatment. AU - Brahm,Carl-Otto, AU - Lundgren,Jesper, AU - Carlsson,Sven G, AU - Nilsson,Peter, AU - Hultqvist,Johanna, AU - Hägglin,Catharina, Y1 - 2013/01/19/ PY - 2012/11/01/accepted PY - 2013/5/11/entrez PY - 2013/5/11/pubmed PY - 2014/1/7/medline SP - 283 EP - 91 JF - European journal of oral sciences JO - Eur J Oral Sci VL - 121 IS - 3 Pt 2 N2 - The aims were to explore dentists' skills in dental fear, current strategies when treating fearful adult patients, and the possible need for additional education among dentists working in Sweden. A sample of 1,293 members of the Association of Public Health Dentists in Sweden were asked to respond to a Web survey concerning dental fear. The response rate was 69% (n = 889); 91% trained in Sweden and 9% trained in another country. The most frequently used pharmacological anxiety-reducing techniques were medication with a midazolame mixture (72%) and benzodiazepine tablets (77%), and the most commonly used psychological techniques were relaxation (68%), distraction (66%), and Tell-Show-Do (86%). A larger proportion of dentists trained in Sweden, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries, reported that they had received undergraduate training in dental fear. Dentists trained in Sweden more often reported competence in pharmacological and psychological anxiety-reducing techniques, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries. Higher levels of self-rated efficacy in treating fearful patients accompanied additional education in dental fear after graduation. In conclusion, Swedish dentists use a variety of techniques to meet the needs of fearful dental patients. Competence in anxiety-reducing techniques is associated with self-efficacy and the site of education. SN - 1600-0722 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23659263/Dentists'_skills_with_fearful_patients:_education_and_treatment_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/eos.12017 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -