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No evidence for behavioural adaptations to nematode parasitism by the fly Drosophila putrida.
J Evol Biol. 2013 Aug; 26(8):1646-54.JE

Abstract

Behavioural adaptations of hosts to their parasites form an important component of the evolutionary dynamics of host-parasite interactions. As mushroom-feeding Drosophila can tolerate deadly mycotoxins, but their Howardula nematode parasites cannot, we asked how consuming the potent mycotoxin α-amanitin has affected this host-parasite interaction. We used the fly D. putrida and its parasite H. aoronymphium, which is both highly virulent and at high prevalence in some populations, and investigated whether adult flies utilize food with toxin to prevent infection in the next generation or consume the toxin to reduce the virulence of an already established infection. First, we found that uninfected females did not prefer to eat or lay their eggs on toxic food, indicating that selection has not acted on the flies to alter their behaviour towards α-amanitin to prevent their offspring from becoming infected by Howardula. However, we cannot rule out that flies use an alternate cue that is associated with toxin presence in the wild. Second, we found that infected females did not prefer to eat food with α-amanitin and that consuming α-amanitin did not cure or reduce the virulence of the parasite in adults that were already infected. In sum, our results indicate there are no direct effects of eating α-amanitin on this host-parasite interaction, and we suggest that toxin tolerance is more likely maintained by selection due to competition for resources than as a mechanism to avoid parasite infection or to reduce the virulence of infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23663194

Citation

Debban, C L., and K A. Dyer. "No Evidence for Behavioural Adaptations to Nematode Parasitism By the Fly Drosophila Putrida." Journal of Evolutionary Biology, vol. 26, no. 8, 2013, pp. 1646-54.
Debban CL, Dyer KA. No evidence for behavioural adaptations to nematode parasitism by the fly Drosophila putrida. J Evol Biol. 2013;26(8):1646-54.
Debban, C. L., & Dyer, K. A. (2013). No evidence for behavioural adaptations to nematode parasitism by the fly Drosophila putrida. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 26(8), 1646-54. https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.12158
Debban CL, Dyer KA. No Evidence for Behavioural Adaptations to Nematode Parasitism By the Fly Drosophila Putrida. J Evol Biol. 2013;26(8):1646-54. PubMed PMID: 23663194.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - No evidence for behavioural adaptations to nematode parasitism by the fly Drosophila putrida. AU - Debban,C L, AU - Dyer,K A, Y1 - 2013/05/11/ PY - 2012/07/24/received PY - 2013/02/27/revised PY - 2013/03/15/accepted PY - 2013/5/14/entrez PY - 2013/5/15/pubmed PY - 2014/3/19/medline KW - Howardula aoronymphium KW - alpha-amanitin KW - behaviour KW - host-parasite interaction KW - self-medication KW - zoopharmacognosy SP - 1646 EP - 54 JF - Journal of evolutionary biology JO - J Evol Biol VL - 26 IS - 8 N2 - Behavioural adaptations of hosts to their parasites form an important component of the evolutionary dynamics of host-parasite interactions. As mushroom-feeding Drosophila can tolerate deadly mycotoxins, but their Howardula nematode parasites cannot, we asked how consuming the potent mycotoxin α-amanitin has affected this host-parasite interaction. We used the fly D. putrida and its parasite H. aoronymphium, which is both highly virulent and at high prevalence in some populations, and investigated whether adult flies utilize food with toxin to prevent infection in the next generation or consume the toxin to reduce the virulence of an already established infection. First, we found that uninfected females did not prefer to eat or lay their eggs on toxic food, indicating that selection has not acted on the flies to alter their behaviour towards α-amanitin to prevent their offspring from becoming infected by Howardula. However, we cannot rule out that flies use an alternate cue that is associated with toxin presence in the wild. Second, we found that infected females did not prefer to eat food with α-amanitin and that consuming α-amanitin did not cure or reduce the virulence of the parasite in adults that were already infected. In sum, our results indicate there are no direct effects of eating α-amanitin on this host-parasite interaction, and we suggest that toxin tolerance is more likely maintained by selection due to competition for resources than as a mechanism to avoid parasite infection or to reduce the virulence of infection. SN - 1420-9101 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23663194/No_evidence_for_behavioural_adaptations_to_nematode_parasitism_by_the_fly_Drosophila_putrida_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.12158 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -