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Antipsychotic augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in resistant tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a naturalistic comparative study.
J Psychiatr Res. 2013 Aug; 47(8):1007-12.JP

Abstract

The aim of this study is to assess efficacy of augmentation of SSRIs with risperidone or aripiprazole in youths with tic-related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) non responders to an SSRI monotherapy. 120 consecutive patients (age range 7-18 years) were treated with an SSRI monotherapy for at least 12 weeks, 51 (42.5%) were responders, and the 69 non-responders (mean age 13.7 ± 2.4 years) were included in this study. 35 patients received an augmentation with risperidone (1.7 ± .8 mg/day), and 34 with aripiprazole (8.9 ± 3.1 mg/day) for 12 weeks. Regarding the OCD symptomatology, at the endpoint the Clinical Global Impression-Severity score (CGI-S) improved from 5.6 ± .8 (severely ill), to 3.2 ± .9 (mild to moderately ill) (p < .0001), and the Children-Global Assessment Scale (C-GAS) from 40.3 ± 5.2 to 53.8 ± 9.2 (p < .0001). Thirty-nine patients (56.5%) were responders in OCD symptomatology (CGI-I score 1 or 2, CGI-S score 3 or less and C-GAS score 50 or more during three consecutive months after a 12-week treatment). Compared to non responders, they were less impaired at the baseline in CGI-S (p < .0001) and C-GAS (p < .0001). Subtypes of OCD and comorbidity did not affect the response. No differences were found between risperidone and aripiprazole augmentation. 47 patients (68.1%) significantly improved tics, without differences between risperidone and aripiprazole. None discontinued medications because of side effects, but risperidone was associated with weight gain and sedation, and aripiprazole to mild/moderate agitation. In tic-related pediatric OCD, augmentation of SSRIs with risperidone or aripiprazole was tolerated and effective in about half of the patients non responding to an SSRI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

IRCCS Stella Maris, Scientific Institute Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Calambrone, Pisa, Italy. gabriele.masi@inpe.unipi.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23664673

Citation

Masi, Gabriele, et al. "Antipsychotic Augmentation of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Resistant Tic-related Obsessive-compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents: a Naturalistic Comparative Study." Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 47, no. 8, 2013, pp. 1007-12.
Masi G, Pfanner C, Brovedani P. Antipsychotic augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in resistant tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a naturalistic comparative study. J Psychiatr Res. 2013;47(8):1007-12.
Masi, G., Pfanner, C., & Brovedani, P. (2013). Antipsychotic augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in resistant tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a naturalistic comparative study. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 47(8), 1007-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.04.003
Masi G, Pfanner C, Brovedani P. Antipsychotic Augmentation of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Resistant Tic-related Obsessive-compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents: a Naturalistic Comparative Study. J Psychiatr Res. 2013;47(8):1007-12. PubMed PMID: 23664673.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antipsychotic augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in resistant tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a naturalistic comparative study. AU - Masi,Gabriele, AU - Pfanner,Chiara, AU - Brovedani,Paola, Y1 - 2013/05/08/ PY - 2012/12/31/received PY - 2013/03/18/revised PY - 2013/04/02/accepted PY - 2013/5/14/entrez PY - 2013/5/15/pubmed PY - 2014/1/24/medline SP - 1007 EP - 12 JF - Journal of psychiatric research JO - J Psychiatr Res VL - 47 IS - 8 N2 - The aim of this study is to assess efficacy of augmentation of SSRIs with risperidone or aripiprazole in youths with tic-related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) non responders to an SSRI monotherapy. 120 consecutive patients (age range 7-18 years) were treated with an SSRI monotherapy for at least 12 weeks, 51 (42.5%) were responders, and the 69 non-responders (mean age 13.7 ± 2.4 years) were included in this study. 35 patients received an augmentation with risperidone (1.7 ± .8 mg/day), and 34 with aripiprazole (8.9 ± 3.1 mg/day) for 12 weeks. Regarding the OCD symptomatology, at the endpoint the Clinical Global Impression-Severity score (CGI-S) improved from 5.6 ± .8 (severely ill), to 3.2 ± .9 (mild to moderately ill) (p < .0001), and the Children-Global Assessment Scale (C-GAS) from 40.3 ± 5.2 to 53.8 ± 9.2 (p < .0001). Thirty-nine patients (56.5%) were responders in OCD symptomatology (CGI-I score 1 or 2, CGI-S score 3 or less and C-GAS score 50 or more during three consecutive months after a 12-week treatment). Compared to non responders, they were less impaired at the baseline in CGI-S (p < .0001) and C-GAS (p < .0001). Subtypes of OCD and comorbidity did not affect the response. No differences were found between risperidone and aripiprazole augmentation. 47 patients (68.1%) significantly improved tics, without differences between risperidone and aripiprazole. None discontinued medications because of side effects, but risperidone was associated with weight gain and sedation, and aripiprazole to mild/moderate agitation. In tic-related pediatric OCD, augmentation of SSRIs with risperidone or aripiprazole was tolerated and effective in about half of the patients non responding to an SSRI. SN - 1879-1379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23664673/Antipsychotic_augmentation_of_selective_serotonin_reuptake_inhibitors_in_resistant_tic_related_obsessive_compulsive_disorder_in_children_and_adolescents:_a_naturalistic_comparative_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3956(13)00122-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -