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Severe destruction of the temporomandibular joint with complete resorption of the condyle associated with synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome.

Abstract

The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome consists of a combination of inflammatory bone disorders and dermatologic pathology. Bone lesions as a form of diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis in the mandible occur in the posterior body and ramus. Bone lesions rarely spread to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) where ankylosis may result. Herein we present an unusual case of SAPHO syndrome with TMJ involvement in which severe destruction of the TMJ occurred. We observed an extension of the invasive soft tissue lesion into the infratemporal fossa from the TMJ with complete resorption of the condyle. In contrast to other previously reported cases, in our case the condyle was strongly suspected as the primary site of the bone lesion with subsequent extension to the ramus and infratemporal fossa. The destructive nature and related symptoms resembled a malignant tumor.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan. damadama@dent.niigata-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23664782

Citation

Kodama, Yasumitsu, et al. "Severe Destruction of the Temporomandibular Joint With Complete Resorption of the Condyle Associated With Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis Syndrome." Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, vol. 116, no. 2, 2013, pp. e128-33.
Kodama Y, Tanaka R, Kurokawa A, et al. Severe destruction of the temporomandibular joint with complete resorption of the condyle associated with synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol. 2013;116(2):e128-33.
Kodama, Y., Tanaka, R., Kurokawa, A., Ohnuki, H., Sultana, S., Hayashi, T., ... Takagi, R. (2013). Severe destruction of the temporomandibular joint with complete resorption of the condyle associated with synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, 116(2), pp. e128-33. doi:10.1016/j.oooo.2013.03.011.
Kodama Y, et al. Severe Destruction of the Temporomandibular Joint With Complete Resorption of the Condyle Associated With Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis Syndrome. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol. 2013;116(2):e128-33. PubMed PMID: 23664782.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe destruction of the temporomandibular joint with complete resorption of the condyle associated with synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome. AU - Kodama,Yasumitsu, AU - Tanaka,Ray, AU - Kurokawa,Akira, AU - Ohnuki,Hisashi, AU - Sultana,Sara, AU - Hayashi,Takafumi, AU - Iizuka,Tateyuki, AU - Takagi,Ritsuo, Y1 - 2013/05/08/ PY - 2012/10/15/received PY - 2013/02/26/revised PY - 2013/03/06/accepted PY - 2013/5/14/entrez PY - 2013/5/15/pubmed PY - 2014/3/29/medline SP - e128 EP - 33 JF - Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology and oral radiology JO - Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol VL - 116 IS - 2 N2 - The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome consists of a combination of inflammatory bone disorders and dermatologic pathology. Bone lesions as a form of diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis in the mandible occur in the posterior body and ramus. Bone lesions rarely spread to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) where ankylosis may result. Herein we present an unusual case of SAPHO syndrome with TMJ involvement in which severe destruction of the TMJ occurred. We observed an extension of the invasive soft tissue lesion into the infratemporal fossa from the TMJ with complete resorption of the condyle. In contrast to other previously reported cases, in our case the condyle was strongly suspected as the primary site of the bone lesion with subsequent extension to the ramus and infratemporal fossa. The destructive nature and related symptoms resembled a malignant tumor. SN - 2212-4411 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23664782/Severe_destruction_of_the_temporomandibular_joint_with_complete_resorption_of_the_condyle_associated_with_synovitis_acne_pustulosis_hyperostosis_and_osteitis_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-4403(13)00171-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -