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Reverse correlation reveals how observers sample visual information when estimating three-dimensional shape.
Vision Res. 2013 Jun 28; 86:115-27.VR

Abstract

Human observers exhibit large systematic distance-dependent biases when estimating the three-dimensional (3D) shape of objects defined by binocular image disparities. This has led some to question the utility of disparity as a cue to 3D shape and whether accurate estimation of 3D shape is at all possible. Others have argued that accurate perception is possible, but only with large continuous perspective transformations of an object. Using a stimulus that is known to elicit large distance-dependent perceptual bias (random dot stereograms of elliptical cylinders) we show that contrary to these findings the simple adoption of a more naturalistic viewing angle completely eliminates this bias. Using behavioural psychophysics, coupled with a novel surface-based reverse correlation methodology, we show that it is binocular edge and contour information that allows for accurate and precise perception and that observers actively exploit and sample this information when it is available.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB1 5QJ, United Kingdom. ps611@cam.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23665429

Citation

Scarfe, Peter, and Paul B. Hibbard. "Reverse Correlation Reveals How Observers Sample Visual Information when Estimating Three-dimensional Shape." Vision Research, vol. 86, 2013, pp. 115-27.
Scarfe P, Hibbard PB. Reverse correlation reveals how observers sample visual information when estimating three-dimensional shape. Vision Res. 2013;86:115-27.
Scarfe, P., & Hibbard, P. B. (2013). Reverse correlation reveals how observers sample visual information when estimating three-dimensional shape. Vision Research, 86, 115-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2013.04.016
Scarfe P, Hibbard PB. Reverse Correlation Reveals How Observers Sample Visual Information when Estimating Three-dimensional Shape. Vision Res. 2013 Jun 28;86:115-27. PubMed PMID: 23665429.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reverse correlation reveals how observers sample visual information when estimating three-dimensional shape. AU - Scarfe,Peter, AU - Hibbard,Paul B, Y1 - 2013/05/09/ PY - 2012/07/12/received PY - 2013/03/14/revised PY - 2013/04/24/accepted PY - 2013/5/14/entrez PY - 2013/5/15/pubmed PY - 2014/1/1/medline SP - 115 EP - 27 JF - Vision research JO - Vision Res. VL - 86 N2 - Human observers exhibit large systematic distance-dependent biases when estimating the three-dimensional (3D) shape of objects defined by binocular image disparities. This has led some to question the utility of disparity as a cue to 3D shape and whether accurate estimation of 3D shape is at all possible. Others have argued that accurate perception is possible, but only with large continuous perspective transformations of an object. Using a stimulus that is known to elicit large distance-dependent perceptual bias (random dot stereograms of elliptical cylinders) we show that contrary to these findings the simple adoption of a more naturalistic viewing angle completely eliminates this bias. Using behavioural psychophysics, coupled with a novel surface-based reverse correlation methodology, we show that it is binocular edge and contour information that allows for accurate and precise perception and that observers actively exploit and sample this information when it is available. SN - 1878-5646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23665429/Reverse_correlation_reveals_how_observers_sample_visual_information_when_estimating_three_dimensional_shape_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0042-6989(13)00114-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -