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Gastrointestinal helminths of camels (Camelus dromedarius) in center of Iran.
Trop Biomed. 2013 Mar; 30(1):56-61.TB

Abstract

Camels are multipurpose animals in Iran. As parasitic diseases are the major cause of impaired meat and milk production in this animal, the present study aimed at determining gastrointestinal helminthic infections of Iranian camels in the center of the country. Gastrointestinal (GI) tract of 144 carcasses of one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius) slaughtered in Yazd, Esfahan and Kerman provinces' abattoirs were examined for adult helminths. Camels were from both sexes and different ages. Recovered parasites were identified according to described keys by light microscope. Of 144 tested camels, 117 were infected with at least one helminth species (81.3%). A total of 28 worm species from 14 genera were identified in the digestive tract of infected animals, including 26 species of nematodes and two species of cestodes. The infection rates in stomach, small intestine, and caecum/large intestine were 86.3%, 91.5% and 11.1%, respectively. However, no worm was found in the oesophagus. The recovered worms with infection rates are discussed in this paper. In the present study, Haemonchus tataricus, Trichostrongylus hamatus and Trichuris infundibulus are reported from Iranian dromedaries for the first time. Regarding high prevalence of infection, using anthelminthic drugs seemed necessary to improve the health and productivity of camels. On the other hand, the high rate of zoonotic species indicated that camels have important role in maintaining and transmitting infection to humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathobiology, School of Medicine, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23665708

Citation

Anvari-Tafti, M, et al. "Gastrointestinal Helminths of Camels (Camelus Dromedarius) in Center of Iran." Tropical Biomedicine, vol. 30, no. 1, 2013, pp. 56-61.
Anvari-Tafti M, Sazmand A, Hekmatimoghaddam S, et al. Gastrointestinal helminths of camels (Camelus dromedarius) in center of Iran. Trop Biomed. 2013;30(1):56-61.
Anvari-Tafti, M., Sazmand, A., Hekmatimoghaddam, S., & Moobedi, I. (2013). Gastrointestinal helminths of camels (Camelus dromedarius) in center of Iran. Tropical Biomedicine, 30(1), 56-61.
Anvari-Tafti M, et al. Gastrointestinal Helminths of Camels (Camelus Dromedarius) in Center of Iran. Trop Biomed. 2013;30(1):56-61. PubMed PMID: 23665708.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gastrointestinal helminths of camels (Camelus dromedarius) in center of Iran. AU - Anvari-Tafti,M, AU - Sazmand,A, AU - Hekmatimoghaddam,S, AU - Moobedi,I, PY - 2013/5/14/entrez PY - 2013/5/15/pubmed PY - 2013/11/19/medline SP - 56 EP - 61 JF - Tropical biomedicine JO - Trop Biomed VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - Camels are multipurpose animals in Iran. As parasitic diseases are the major cause of impaired meat and milk production in this animal, the present study aimed at determining gastrointestinal helminthic infections of Iranian camels in the center of the country. Gastrointestinal (GI) tract of 144 carcasses of one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius) slaughtered in Yazd, Esfahan and Kerman provinces' abattoirs were examined for adult helminths. Camels were from both sexes and different ages. Recovered parasites were identified according to described keys by light microscope. Of 144 tested camels, 117 were infected with at least one helminth species (81.3%). A total of 28 worm species from 14 genera were identified in the digestive tract of infected animals, including 26 species of nematodes and two species of cestodes. The infection rates in stomach, small intestine, and caecum/large intestine were 86.3%, 91.5% and 11.1%, respectively. However, no worm was found in the oesophagus. The recovered worms with infection rates are discussed in this paper. In the present study, Haemonchus tataricus, Trichostrongylus hamatus and Trichuris infundibulus are reported from Iranian dromedaries for the first time. Regarding high prevalence of infection, using anthelminthic drugs seemed necessary to improve the health and productivity of camels. On the other hand, the high rate of zoonotic species indicated that camels have important role in maintaining and transmitting infection to humans. SN - 0127-5720 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23665708/Gastrointestinal_helminths_of_camels__Camelus_dromedarius__in_center_of_Iran_ L2 - http://www.msptm.org/files/56_-_61_Sazmand_A.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -