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Best friends' discussions of social dilemmas.
J Youth Adolesc. 2014 Feb; 43(2):233-44.JY

Abstract

Peer relationships, particularly friendships, have been theorized to contribute to how children and adolescents think about social and moral issues. The current study examined how young adolescent best friends (191 dyads; 53.4% female) reason together about multifaceted social dilemmas and how their reasoning is related to friendship quality. Mutually-recognized friendship dyads were videotaped discussing dilemmas entailing moral, social-conventional and prudential/pragmatic issues. Both dyad members completed a self-report measure of friendship quality. Dyadic data analyses guided by the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model indicated that adolescent and friend reports of friendship qualities were related to the forms of reasoning used during discussion. Friends who both reported that they could resolve conflicts in a constructive way were more likely to use moral reasoning than friends who reported that their conflict resolution was poor or disagreed on the quality of their conflict resolution. The findings provide evidence for the important role that friendship interaction may play in adolescents' social and moral development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Alabama, Box 870348, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0348, USA, klmcdonald2@ua.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23666555

Citation

McDonald, Kristina L., et al. "Best Friends' Discussions of Social Dilemmas." Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 43, no. 2, 2014, pp. 233-44.
McDonald KL, Malti T, Killen M, et al. Best friends' discussions of social dilemmas. J Youth Adolesc. 2014;43(2):233-44.
McDonald, K. L., Malti, T., Killen, M., & Rubin, K. H. (2014). Best friends' discussions of social dilemmas. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 43(2), 233-44. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-013-9961-1
McDonald KL, et al. Best Friends' Discussions of Social Dilemmas. J Youth Adolesc. 2014;43(2):233-44. PubMed PMID: 23666555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Best friends' discussions of social dilemmas. AU - McDonald,Kristina L, AU - Malti,Tina, AU - Killen,Melanie, AU - Rubin,Kenneth H, Y1 - 2013/05/11/ PY - 2012/11/27/received PY - 2013/05/04/accepted PY - 2013/5/14/entrez PY - 2013/5/15/pubmed PY - 2014/9/30/medline SP - 233 EP - 44 JF - Journal of youth and adolescence JO - J Youth Adolesc VL - 43 IS - 2 N2 - Peer relationships, particularly friendships, have been theorized to contribute to how children and adolescents think about social and moral issues. The current study examined how young adolescent best friends (191 dyads; 53.4% female) reason together about multifaceted social dilemmas and how their reasoning is related to friendship quality. Mutually-recognized friendship dyads were videotaped discussing dilemmas entailing moral, social-conventional and prudential/pragmatic issues. Both dyad members completed a self-report measure of friendship quality. Dyadic data analyses guided by the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model indicated that adolescent and friend reports of friendship qualities were related to the forms of reasoning used during discussion. Friends who both reported that they could resolve conflicts in a constructive way were more likely to use moral reasoning than friends who reported that their conflict resolution was poor or disagreed on the quality of their conflict resolution. The findings provide evidence for the important role that friendship interaction may play in adolescents' social and moral development. SN - 1573-6601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23666555/Best_friends'_discussions_of_social_dilemmas_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -