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Hydrogen cyanide concentrations in the breath of adult cystic fibrosis patients with and without Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.
J Breath Res. 2013 Jun; 7(2):026010.JB

Abstract

Elevated concentrations of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) have been detected in the headspace of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) cultures and in the breath of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and PA infection. The use of mouth-exhaled breath HCN as a marker of PA infection in adults is more difficult to assess as some without PA infection generate HCN in their mouths. The analysis of breath exhaled via the nose, thereby avoiding volatile compounds produced in the mouth, will demonstrate elevated concentrations of HCN in adult CF patients chronically infected with PA. Using selected ion flow mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS), the mouth and the nose-exhaled breaths of 20 adult CF patients; 10 with chronic PA infection and 10 free from PA infection, were analysed for HCN. Acetone and ethanol were also measured as controls. SIFT-MS allows direct sampling and analysis of single breath exhalations, obviating the need to collect samples into bags or onto traps, which can compromise samples. HCN was detected in the mouth-exhaled breath of patients in both groups and in the nose-exhaled breath of patients with chronic PA infection. The difference in median (IQR) nose-exhaled HCN between the groups is statistically significant (11 (0.8-18) ppbv versus 0 (0-3.2) ppbv, p = 0.03). The concentrations of acetone and ethanol in nose-exhaled and mouth-exhaled breath are in keeping with previous studies. HCN in nose-exhaled breath is a biomarker of chronic airway infection with PA in adults with CF. Its application as a non-invasive diagnostic test for early PA infection warrants further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Academic Department of Child Health, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Newcastle Road, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 6QG, UK. fjgilchrist@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23680696

Citation

Gilchrist, Francis J., et al. "Hydrogen Cyanide Concentrations in the Breath of Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients With and Without Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection." Journal of Breath Research, vol. 7, no. 2, 2013, p. 026010.
Gilchrist FJ, Bright-Thomas RJ, Jones AM, et al. Hydrogen cyanide concentrations in the breath of adult cystic fibrosis patients with and without Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. J Breath Res. 2013;7(2):026010.
Gilchrist, F. J., Bright-Thomas, R. J., Jones, A. M., Smith, D., Spaněl, P., Webb, A. K., & Lenney, W. (2013). Hydrogen cyanide concentrations in the breath of adult cystic fibrosis patients with and without Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Journal of Breath Research, 7(2), 026010. https://doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/7/2/026010
Gilchrist FJ, et al. Hydrogen Cyanide Concentrations in the Breath of Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients With and Without Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection. J Breath Res. 2013;7(2):026010. PubMed PMID: 23680696.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hydrogen cyanide concentrations in the breath of adult cystic fibrosis patients with and without Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. AU - Gilchrist,Francis J, AU - Bright-Thomas,Rowland J, AU - Jones,Andrew M, AU - Smith,David, AU - Spaněl,Patrik, AU - Webb,A Kevin, AU - Lenney,Warren, Y1 - 2013/05/17/ PY - 2013/5/18/entrez PY - 2013/5/18/pubmed PY - 2014/6/18/medline SP - 026010 EP - 026010 JF - Journal of breath research JO - J Breath Res VL - 7 IS - 2 N2 - Elevated concentrations of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) have been detected in the headspace of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) cultures and in the breath of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and PA infection. The use of mouth-exhaled breath HCN as a marker of PA infection in adults is more difficult to assess as some without PA infection generate HCN in their mouths. The analysis of breath exhaled via the nose, thereby avoiding volatile compounds produced in the mouth, will demonstrate elevated concentrations of HCN in adult CF patients chronically infected with PA. Using selected ion flow mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS), the mouth and the nose-exhaled breaths of 20 adult CF patients; 10 with chronic PA infection and 10 free from PA infection, were analysed for HCN. Acetone and ethanol were also measured as controls. SIFT-MS allows direct sampling and analysis of single breath exhalations, obviating the need to collect samples into bags or onto traps, which can compromise samples. HCN was detected in the mouth-exhaled breath of patients in both groups and in the nose-exhaled breath of patients with chronic PA infection. The difference in median (IQR) nose-exhaled HCN between the groups is statistically significant (11 (0.8-18) ppbv versus 0 (0-3.2) ppbv, p = 0.03). The concentrations of acetone and ethanol in nose-exhaled and mouth-exhaled breath are in keeping with previous studies. HCN in nose-exhaled breath is a biomarker of chronic airway infection with PA in adults with CF. Its application as a non-invasive diagnostic test for early PA infection warrants further investigation. SN - 1752-7163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23680696/Hydrogen_cyanide_concentrations_in_the_breath_of_adult_cystic_fibrosis_patients_with_and_without_Pseudomonas_aeruginosa_infection_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/7/2/026010 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -