Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of nutrient supplementation on atopic dermatitis in children: a systematic review of probiotics, prebiotics, formula, and fatty acids.
JAMA Dermatol. 2013 Mar; 149(3):350-5.JD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify whether nutrient supplementation with probiotics, prebiotics, formula, or fatty acids prevents the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) or reduces the severity of AD in newborns to children younger than 3 years.

DATA SOURCES

We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature) from January 1, 1946, to August 27, 2012, and performed an additional manual search.

STUDY SELECTION

Randomized controlled trials and cohort studies examining nutritional supplementation in prevention and amelioration of AD among children younger than 3 years.

DATA EXTRACTION

Of 92 articles, 21 met inclusion criteria.

DATA SYNTHESIS

In the 21 studies, a total of 6859 participants received supplements, which included infants or mothers who were either pregnant or breastfeeding;4134 infants or mothers served as controls. Nutritional supplementation was shown to be an effective method in preventing AD (11 of 17 studies) or decreasing its severity(5 of 6 studies). The best evidence lies with probiotics supplementation in mothers and infants in preventing development and reducing severity of AD. Specifically, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was effective in long-term prevention of AD development. γ-Linolenic acid reduced severity of AD. Supplementation with prebiotics and black currant seed oil (γ-linolenic acid and ω-3 combination) was effective in reducing the development of AD. Conflicting findings were reported from different research groups that performed supplementation with an amino acid–based formula.

CONCLUSIONS

Certain types of nutrient supplementation are beneficial in preventing AD development and reducing its severity. Future research elucidating the mechanisms underlying the actions of nutritional supplementation on AD is necessary.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, University of California at Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA 95816, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23682371

Citation

Foolad, Negar, et al. "Effect of Nutrient Supplementation On Atopic Dermatitis in Children: a Systematic Review of Probiotics, Prebiotics, Formula, and Fatty Acids." JAMA Dermatology, vol. 149, no. 3, 2013, pp. 350-5.
Foolad N, Brezinski EA, Chase EP, et al. Effect of nutrient supplementation on atopic dermatitis in children: a systematic review of probiotics, prebiotics, formula, and fatty acids. JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(3):350-5.
Foolad, N., Brezinski, E. A., Chase, E. P., & Armstrong, A. W. (2013). Effect of nutrient supplementation on atopic dermatitis in children: a systematic review of probiotics, prebiotics, formula, and fatty acids. JAMA Dermatology, 149(3), 350-5.
Foolad N, et al. Effect of Nutrient Supplementation On Atopic Dermatitis in Children: a Systematic Review of Probiotics, Prebiotics, Formula, and Fatty Acids. JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(3):350-5. PubMed PMID: 23682371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of nutrient supplementation on atopic dermatitis in children: a systematic review of probiotics, prebiotics, formula, and fatty acids. AU - Foolad,Negar, AU - Brezinski,Elizabeth A, AU - Chase,Elizabeth P, AU - Armstrong,April W, PY - 2013/5/18/entrez PY - 2013/5/18/pubmed PY - 2013/5/29/medline SP - 350 EP - 5 JF - JAMA dermatology JO - JAMA Dermatol VL - 149 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify whether nutrient supplementation with probiotics, prebiotics, formula, or fatty acids prevents the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) or reduces the severity of AD in newborns to children younger than 3 years. DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature) from January 1, 1946, to August 27, 2012, and performed an additional manual search. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials and cohort studies examining nutritional supplementation in prevention and amelioration of AD among children younger than 3 years. DATA EXTRACTION: Of 92 articles, 21 met inclusion criteria. DATA SYNTHESIS: In the 21 studies, a total of 6859 participants received supplements, which included infants or mothers who were either pregnant or breastfeeding;4134 infants or mothers served as controls. Nutritional supplementation was shown to be an effective method in preventing AD (11 of 17 studies) or decreasing its severity(5 of 6 studies). The best evidence lies with probiotics supplementation in mothers and infants in preventing development and reducing severity of AD. Specifically, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was effective in long-term prevention of AD development. γ-Linolenic acid reduced severity of AD. Supplementation with prebiotics and black currant seed oil (γ-linolenic acid and ω-3 combination) was effective in reducing the development of AD. Conflicting findings were reported from different research groups that performed supplementation with an amino acid–based formula. CONCLUSIONS: Certain types of nutrient supplementation are beneficial in preventing AD development and reducing its severity. Future research elucidating the mechanisms underlying the actions of nutritional supplementation on AD is necessary. SN - 2168-6084 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23682371/Effect_of_nutrient_supplementation_on_atopic_dermatitis_in_children:_a_systematic_review_of_probiotics_prebiotics_formula_and_fatty_acids_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.1495 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -