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Differential sweetness of commercial sour liquids elicited by miracle fruit in healthy young adults.
Food Sci Technol Int. 2013 Jun; 19(3):243-9.FS

Abstract

Miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) contains the glycoprotein miraculin which turns a sour taste into a sweet one. Chemical analyses and sensory evaluation experiments were conducted to examine the sweetening effect of miracle fruit with regard to five different commercial sour liquids which were diluted until they were subjectively equally sour. HPLC-based analyses revealed that (1) the predominating acids in two and three of the liquids were citric acid and acetic acid, respectively and (2) all five liquids contained fructose and glucose. Healthy young adults (eight males and 10 females) in the sensory evaluation experiments were asked to chew a miracle fruit and apply their saliva to the oral mucosae. They were asked to score the sweetness elicited by the five liquids relative to a sucrose standard at 0, 15, 25 and 35 min thereafter. The citric acid-based liquids were perceived as being sweeter than the acetic acid-based liquids at all timepoints. Thus, commercial sour liquids that mainly contain citric acid are more effective than acetic acid-based liquids in eliciting a perception of sweetness after the miracle fruit application, while the sugars in the liquids seemed to play a minimal role as determinants of sweetness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Nutrition, Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23685565

Citation

Igarashi, Go, et al. "Differential Sweetness of Commercial Sour Liquids Elicited By Miracle Fruit in Healthy Young Adults." Food Science and Technology International = Ciencia Y Tecnologia De Los Alimentos Internacional, vol. 19, no. 3, 2013, pp. 243-9.
Igarashi G, Higuchi R, Yamazaki T, et al. Differential sweetness of commercial sour liquids elicited by miracle fruit in healthy young adults. Food Sci Technol Int. 2013;19(3):243-9.
Igarashi, G., Higuchi, R., Yamazaki, T., Ito, N., Ashida, I., & Miyaoka, Y. (2013). Differential sweetness of commercial sour liquids elicited by miracle fruit in healthy young adults. Food Science and Technology International = Ciencia Y Tecnologia De Los Alimentos Internacional, 19(3), 243-9. https://doi.org/10.1177/1082013212443060
Igarashi G, et al. Differential Sweetness of Commercial Sour Liquids Elicited By Miracle Fruit in Healthy Young Adults. Food Sci Technol Int. 2013;19(3):243-9. PubMed PMID: 23685565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differential sweetness of commercial sour liquids elicited by miracle fruit in healthy young adults. AU - Igarashi,Go, AU - Higuchi,Ryota, AU - Yamazaki,Takako, AU - Ito,Naoko, AU - Ashida,Ichiro, AU - Miyaoka,Yozo, PY - 2013/5/21/entrez PY - 2013/5/21/pubmed PY - 2013/8/16/medline KW - Taste modifier KW - miracle fruit KW - normal adults KW - sourness KW - sweetness SP - 243 EP - 9 JF - Food science and technology international = Ciencia y tecnologia de los alimentos internacional JO - Food Sci Technol Int VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - Miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) contains the glycoprotein miraculin which turns a sour taste into a sweet one. Chemical analyses and sensory evaluation experiments were conducted to examine the sweetening effect of miracle fruit with regard to five different commercial sour liquids which were diluted until they were subjectively equally sour. HPLC-based analyses revealed that (1) the predominating acids in two and three of the liquids were citric acid and acetic acid, respectively and (2) all five liquids contained fructose and glucose. Healthy young adults (eight males and 10 females) in the sensory evaluation experiments were asked to chew a miracle fruit and apply their saliva to the oral mucosae. They were asked to score the sweetness elicited by the five liquids relative to a sucrose standard at 0, 15, 25 and 35 min thereafter. The citric acid-based liquids were perceived as being sweeter than the acetic acid-based liquids at all timepoints. Thus, commercial sour liquids that mainly contain citric acid are more effective than acetic acid-based liquids in eliciting a perception of sweetness after the miracle fruit application, while the sugars in the liquids seemed to play a minimal role as determinants of sweetness. SN - 1082-0132 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23685565/Differential_sweetness_of_commercial_sour_liquids_elicited_by_miracle_fruit_in_healthy_young_adults_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1082013212443060?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -