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Causes of bleeding and outcomes in patients hospitalized with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2014 Feb; 48(2):113-8.JC

Abstract

GOALS

To evaluate sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) at an urban US hospital and compare them to sources at the same center 20 years ago, and to assess clinical outcomes related to source of UGIB.

BACKGROUND

Recent studies suggest changes in causes and outcomes of UGIB.

STUDY

Consecutive patients with hematemesis, melena, and/or hematochezia undergoing upper endoscopy with an identified source at LA County+USC Medical Center from January 2005 to June 2011 were identified retrospectively.

RESULTS

Mean age of the 1929 patients was 52 years; 75% were male. A total of 1073 (55%) presented with hematemesis, 809 (42%) with melena alone, and 47 (2%) with hematochezia alone. The most common causes were ulcers in 654 patients (34%), varices in 633 (33%), and erosive esophagitis in 156 (8%), compared with 43%, 33%, and 2% in 1991. During hospitalization, 207 (10.7%) patients required repeat endoscopy for UGIB (10.6% for both ulcers and varices) and 129 (6.7%) died (5.2% for ulcers; 9.2% for varices). On multivariate analysis, hematemesis (OR=1.38; 95% CI, 1.04-1.88) and having insurance (OR=1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.94) were associated with repeat endoscopy for UGIB. Varices (OR=1.53; 95% CI, 1.05-2.22) and having insurance (OR=4.53; 95% CI, 2.84-7.24) were associated with mortality.

CONCLUSION

Peptic ulcers decreased modestly over 2 decades, whereas varices continue as a common cause of UGIB at an urban hospital serving lower socioeconomic patients. Inpatient mortality, but not rebleeding requiring endoscopy, was higher with variceal than nonvariceal UGIB, indicating patients with variceal UGIB remain at risk of death from decompensation of underlying illness even after successful control of bleeding.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Division of Gastroenterology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda †Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA ‡Section of Digestives Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven §VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23685847

Citation

Kim, John J., et al. "Causes of Bleeding and Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding." Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 48, no. 2, 2014, pp. 113-8.
Kim JJ, Sheibani S, Park S, et al. Causes of bleeding and outcomes in patients hospitalized with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2014;48(2):113-8.
Kim, J. J., Sheibani, S., Park, S., Buxbaum, J., & Laine, L. (2014). Causes of bleeding and outcomes in patients hospitalized with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 48(2), 113-8. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0b013e318297fb40
Kim JJ, et al. Causes of Bleeding and Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2014;48(2):113-8. PubMed PMID: 23685847.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Causes of bleeding and outcomes in patients hospitalized with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. AU - Kim,John J, AU - Sheibani,Sarah, AU - Park,Sunhee, AU - Buxbaum,James, AU - Laine,Loren, PY - 2013/5/21/entrez PY - 2013/5/21/pubmed PY - 2014/10/1/medline SP - 113 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical gastroenterology JO - J. Clin. Gastroenterol. VL - 48 IS - 2 N2 - GOALS: To evaluate sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) at an urban US hospital and compare them to sources at the same center 20 years ago, and to assess clinical outcomes related to source of UGIB. BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest changes in causes and outcomes of UGIB. STUDY: Consecutive patients with hematemesis, melena, and/or hematochezia undergoing upper endoscopy with an identified source at LA County+USC Medical Center from January 2005 to June 2011 were identified retrospectively. RESULTS: Mean age of the 1929 patients was 52 years; 75% were male. A total of 1073 (55%) presented with hematemesis, 809 (42%) with melena alone, and 47 (2%) with hematochezia alone. The most common causes were ulcers in 654 patients (34%), varices in 633 (33%), and erosive esophagitis in 156 (8%), compared with 43%, 33%, and 2% in 1991. During hospitalization, 207 (10.7%) patients required repeat endoscopy for UGIB (10.6% for both ulcers and varices) and 129 (6.7%) died (5.2% for ulcers; 9.2% for varices). On multivariate analysis, hematemesis (OR=1.38; 95% CI, 1.04-1.88) and having insurance (OR=1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.94) were associated with repeat endoscopy for UGIB. Varices (OR=1.53; 95% CI, 1.05-2.22) and having insurance (OR=4.53; 95% CI, 2.84-7.24) were associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: Peptic ulcers decreased modestly over 2 decades, whereas varices continue as a common cause of UGIB at an urban hospital serving lower socioeconomic patients. Inpatient mortality, but not rebleeding requiring endoscopy, was higher with variceal than nonvariceal UGIB, indicating patients with variceal UGIB remain at risk of death from decompensation of underlying illness even after successful control of bleeding. SN - 1539-2031 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23685847/Causes_of_bleeding_and_outcomes_in_patients_hospitalized_with_upper_gastrointestinal_bleeding_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0b013e318297fb40 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -