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Dietary fat in breast cancer survival.

Abstract

Laboratory evidence suggests a plausible role for dietary fat in breast cancer pathophysiology. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the epidemiological evidence on the impact of total dietary fat and fat subtypes, measured pre- and/or postcancer diagnosis, in relation to breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality among breast cancer survivors. Studies were included if they were in English, had a sample size ≥200, and presented the hazard ratio/rate ratio for recurrence, disease-specific mortality, or all-cause mortality (n = 18). Although the results are mixed, most studies suggested that higher saturated fat intake prediagnosis was associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Postdiagnostic trans fat intake was associated with a 45% and 78% increased risk of all-cause mortality. Higher monounsaturated fat intake before and after diagnosis was generally associated with increased risk of all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality, albeit the majority of the studies were statistically nonsignificant. Two studies evaluating omega-3 fat intake suggested an inverse association with all-cause mortality. Although there were too few studies on fat subtypes to draw definitive conclusions, high consumption of saturated fat may exert a detrimental effect on breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, whereas omega-3 fat may be beneficial. The inconsistent and limited evidence warrants research to assess the impact of consumption of fat subtypes on breast cancer recurrence and mortality.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    Annual review of nutrition 33: 2013 pg 319-48

    MeSH

    Animals
    Breast Neoplasms
    DNA Damage
    Diet, High-Fat
    Female
    Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
    Humans
    Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
    Obesity
    Oxidative Stress
    Prognosis

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review
    Systematic Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23701588

    Citation

    Makarem, Nour, et al. "Dietary Fat in Breast Cancer Survival." Annual Review of Nutrition, vol. 33, 2013, pp. 319-48.
    Makarem N, Chandran U, Bandera EV, et al. Dietary fat in breast cancer survival. Annu Rev Nutr. 2013;33:319-48.
    Makarem, N., Chandran, U., Bandera, E. V., & Parekh, N. (2013). Dietary fat in breast cancer survival. Annual Review of Nutrition, 33, pp. 319-48. doi:10.1146/annurev-nutr-112912-095300.
    Makarem N, et al. Dietary Fat in Breast Cancer Survival. Annu Rev Nutr. 2013;33:319-48. PubMed PMID: 23701588.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat in breast cancer survival. AU - Makarem,Nour, AU - Chandran,Urmila, AU - Bandera,Elisa V, AU - Parekh,Niyati, Y1 - 2013/05/22/ PY - 2013/5/25/entrez PY - 2013/5/25/pubmed PY - 2014/2/14/medline SP - 319 EP - 48 JF - Annual review of nutrition JO - Annu. Rev. Nutr. VL - 33 N2 - Laboratory evidence suggests a plausible role for dietary fat in breast cancer pathophysiology. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the epidemiological evidence on the impact of total dietary fat and fat subtypes, measured pre- and/or postcancer diagnosis, in relation to breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality among breast cancer survivors. Studies were included if they were in English, had a sample size ≥200, and presented the hazard ratio/rate ratio for recurrence, disease-specific mortality, or all-cause mortality (n = 18). Although the results are mixed, most studies suggested that higher saturated fat intake prediagnosis was associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Postdiagnostic trans fat intake was associated with a 45% and 78% increased risk of all-cause mortality. Higher monounsaturated fat intake before and after diagnosis was generally associated with increased risk of all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality, albeit the majority of the studies were statistically nonsignificant. Two studies evaluating omega-3 fat intake suggested an inverse association with all-cause mortality. Although there were too few studies on fat subtypes to draw definitive conclusions, high consumption of saturated fat may exert a detrimental effect on breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, whereas omega-3 fat may be beneficial. The inconsistent and limited evidence warrants research to assess the impact of consumption of fat subtypes on breast cancer recurrence and mortality. SN - 1545-4312 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23701588/full_citation L2 - http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev-nutr-112912-095300?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -