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Effects of carbohydrate-hydration strategies on glucose metabolism, sprint performance and hydration during a soccer match simulation in recreational players.
J Sci Med Sport. 2014 Mar; 17(2):239-43.JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study compared the effects of three carbohydrate-hydration strategies on blood glucose concentration, exercise performance and hydration status throughout simulated soccer match-play.

DESIGN

A randomized, double-blind and cross-over study design was employed.

METHODS

After familiarization, 14 recreational soccer players completed the soccer match simulation on three separate occasions. Participants consumed equal volumes of 9.6% carbohydrate-caffeine-electrolyte (∼ 6 mg/kg BW caffeine) solution with carbohydrate-electrolyte gels (H-CHO), 5.6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution with electrolyte gels (CHO) or electrolyte solution and electrolyte gels (PL). Blood samples were taken at rest, immediately before exercise and every 15 min during exercise (first half: 15, 30, 45 min; second half: 60, 75, 90 min).

RESULTS

Supplementation influenced blood glucose concentration (time × treatment interaction: p<0.001); however, none of the supplementation regimes were effective in preventing a drop in blood glucose at 60 min. Mean sprint speed was 3 ± 1% faster in H-CHO when compared with PL (treatment: p=0.047). Supplementation caused a 2.3 ± 0.5% increase in plasma osmolality in H-CHO (p<0.001) without change in CHO or PL. Similarly, mean sodium concentrations were 2.1 ± 0.4% higher in H-CHO when compared with PL (p=0.006).

CONCLUSIONS

Combining high carbohydrate availability with caffeine resulted in improved sprint performance and elevated blood glucose concentrations throughout the first half and at 90 min of exercise; however, this supplementation strategy negatively influenced hydration status when compared with 5.6% carbohydrate-electrolyte and electrolyte solutions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Exercise Physiology, La Trobe Rural Health School, La Trobe University, Australia; Sport and Exercise Science, Engineering, Swansea University, UK. Electronic address: m.kingsley@latrobe.edu.au.Nutrition and Bromatology, Pharmacy, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain.Sport and Exercise Science, Engineering, Swansea University, UK.Sport and Exercise Sciences, Northumbria University, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23702257

Citation

Kingsley, Michael, et al. "Effects of Carbohydrate-hydration Strategies On Glucose Metabolism, Sprint Performance and Hydration During a Soccer Match Simulation in Recreational Players." Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 17, no. 2, 2014, pp. 239-43.
Kingsley M, Penas-Ruiz C, Terry C, et al. Effects of carbohydrate-hydration strategies on glucose metabolism, sprint performance and hydration during a soccer match simulation in recreational players. J Sci Med Sport. 2014;17(2):239-43.
Kingsley, M., Penas-Ruiz, C., Terry, C., & Russell, M. (2014). Effects of carbohydrate-hydration strategies on glucose metabolism, sprint performance and hydration during a soccer match simulation in recreational players. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 17(2), 239-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2013.04.010
Kingsley M, et al. Effects of Carbohydrate-hydration Strategies On Glucose Metabolism, Sprint Performance and Hydration During a Soccer Match Simulation in Recreational Players. J Sci Med Sport. 2014;17(2):239-43. PubMed PMID: 23702257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of carbohydrate-hydration strategies on glucose metabolism, sprint performance and hydration during a soccer match simulation in recreational players. AU - Kingsley,Michael, AU - Penas-Ruiz,Carlos, AU - Terry,Chris, AU - Russell,Mark, Y1 - 2013/05/20/ PY - 2012/09/24/received PY - 2013/04/16/revised PY - 2013/04/18/accepted PY - 2013/5/25/entrez PY - 2013/5/25/pubmed PY - 2014/11/15/medline KW - Football KW - Rebound hypoglycemia KW - Shooting KW - Supplementation SP - 239 EP - 43 JF - Journal of science and medicine in sport JO - J Sci Med Sport VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study compared the effects of three carbohydrate-hydration strategies on blood glucose concentration, exercise performance and hydration status throughout simulated soccer match-play. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind and cross-over study design was employed. METHODS: After familiarization, 14 recreational soccer players completed the soccer match simulation on three separate occasions. Participants consumed equal volumes of 9.6% carbohydrate-caffeine-electrolyte (∼ 6 mg/kg BW caffeine) solution with carbohydrate-electrolyte gels (H-CHO), 5.6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution with electrolyte gels (CHO) or electrolyte solution and electrolyte gels (PL). Blood samples were taken at rest, immediately before exercise and every 15 min during exercise (first half: 15, 30, 45 min; second half: 60, 75, 90 min). RESULTS: Supplementation influenced blood glucose concentration (time × treatment interaction: p<0.001); however, none of the supplementation regimes were effective in preventing a drop in blood glucose at 60 min. Mean sprint speed was 3 ± 1% faster in H-CHO when compared with PL (treatment: p=0.047). Supplementation caused a 2.3 ± 0.5% increase in plasma osmolality in H-CHO (p<0.001) without change in CHO or PL. Similarly, mean sodium concentrations were 2.1 ± 0.4% higher in H-CHO when compared with PL (p=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Combining high carbohydrate availability with caffeine resulted in improved sprint performance and elevated blood glucose concentrations throughout the first half and at 90 min of exercise; however, this supplementation strategy negatively influenced hydration status when compared with 5.6% carbohydrate-electrolyte and electrolyte solutions. SN - 1878-1861 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23702257/Effects_of_carbohydrate_hydration_strategies_on_glucose_metabolism_sprint_performance_and_hydration_during_a_soccer_match_simulation_in_recreational_players_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1440-2440(13)00097-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -