Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A combined inspiratory and expiratory muscle training program improves respiratory muscle strength and fatigue in multiple sclerosis.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2013; 94(10):1964-70AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of a short-duration, combined (inspiratory and expiratory), progressive resistance respiratory muscle training (RMT) protocol on respiratory muscle strength, fatigue, health-related quality of life, and functional performance in individuals with mild-to-moderate multiple sclerosis (MS).

DESIGN

Quasi-experimental before-after trial.

SETTING

University rehabilitation research laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS

Volunteers with MS (N=21) were divided into 2 groups: RMT (n=11; 9 women, 2 men; mean age ± SD, 50.9 ± 5.7y, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score ± SD, 3.2 ± 1.9) and a control group that did not train (n=10; 7 women, 3 men; mean age ± SD, 56.2 ± 8.8y, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score ± SD, 4.4 ± 2.1). Expanded Disability Status Scale scores ranged from 1 to ≤6.5. No patients withdrew from the study.

INTERVENTION

Training was a 5-week combined progressive resistance RMT program, 3d/wk, 30 minutes per session.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The primary outcome measures were maximal inspiratory pressure and expiratory pressure and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. All subjects completed secondary measures of pulmonary function, the six-minute walk test, the timed stair climb, the Multiple Sclerosis Self-Efficacy Scale, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, and the Physical Activity Disability Scale.

RESULTS

Maximal inspiratory pressure and expiratory pressure (mean ± SD) increased 35% ± 22% (P<.001) and 26% ± 17% (P<.001), respectively, whereas no changes were noted in the control group (12% ± 23% and -4% ± 17%, respectively). RMT improved fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, P<.029), with no change or worsening in the control group. No changes were noted in the six-minute walk test, stair climb, Multiple Sclerosis Self-Efficacy Scale, or Physical Activity Disability Scale in the RMT group. The control group had decreases in emotional well-being and general health (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey).

CONCLUSIONS

A short-duration, combined RMT program improved inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength and reduced fatigue in patients with mild to moderate MS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation Science, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. Electronic address: adr@buffalo.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23714277

Citation

Ray, Andrew D., et al. "A Combined Inspiratory and Expiratory Muscle Training Program Improves Respiratory Muscle Strength and Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 94, no. 10, 2013, pp. 1964-70.
Ray AD, Udhoji S, Mashtare TL, et al. A combined inspiratory and expiratory muscle training program improves respiratory muscle strength and fatigue in multiple sclerosis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013;94(10):1964-70.
Ray, A. D., Udhoji, S., Mashtare, T. L., & Fisher, N. M. (2013). A combined inspiratory and expiratory muscle training program improves respiratory muscle strength and fatigue in multiple sclerosis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94(10), pp. 1964-70. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2013.05.005.
Ray AD, et al. A Combined Inspiratory and Expiratory Muscle Training Program Improves Respiratory Muscle Strength and Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013;94(10):1964-70. PubMed PMID: 23714277.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A combined inspiratory and expiratory muscle training program improves respiratory muscle strength and fatigue in multiple sclerosis. AU - Ray,Andrew D, AU - Udhoji,Supriya, AU - Mashtare,Terry L, AU - Fisher,Nadine M, Y1 - 2013/05/25/ PY - 2013/02/12/received PY - 2013/04/12/revised PY - 2013/05/13/accepted PY - 2013/5/30/entrez PY - 2013/5/30/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline KW - 6MWT KW - ATS KW - American Thoracic Society KW - Breathing exercises KW - EDSS KW - Expanded Disability Status Scale KW - FEV(1) KW - FVC KW - Fatigue KW - HRQOL KW - MFIS KW - MS KW - MSSE KW - MVV(12) KW - Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey KW - Modified Fatigue Impact Scale KW - Multiple Sclerosis Self-Efficacy Scale KW - Multiple sclerosis KW - PFT KW - Pemax KW - Pimax KW - Positive-pressure respiration KW - RMT KW - Rehabilitation KW - SF-36 KW - forced expiratory volume in 1 second KW - forced vital capacity KW - health-related quality of life KW - maximal expiratory pressure KW - maximal inspiratory pressure KW - maximal voluntary ventilation in 12 seconds KW - multiple sclerosis KW - pulmonary function test KW - respiratory muscle training KW - six-minute walk test SP - 1964 EP - 70 JF - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation JO - Arch Phys Med Rehabil VL - 94 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a short-duration, combined (inspiratory and expiratory), progressive resistance respiratory muscle training (RMT) protocol on respiratory muscle strength, fatigue, health-related quality of life, and functional performance in individuals with mild-to-moderate multiple sclerosis (MS). DESIGN: Quasi-experimental before-after trial. SETTING: University rehabilitation research laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Volunteers with MS (N=21) were divided into 2 groups: RMT (n=11; 9 women, 2 men; mean age ± SD, 50.9 ± 5.7y, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score ± SD, 3.2 ± 1.9) and a control group that did not train (n=10; 7 women, 3 men; mean age ± SD, 56.2 ± 8.8y, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score ± SD, 4.4 ± 2.1). Expanded Disability Status Scale scores ranged from 1 to ≤6.5. No patients withdrew from the study. INTERVENTION: Training was a 5-week combined progressive resistance RMT program, 3d/wk, 30 minutes per session. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measures were maximal inspiratory pressure and expiratory pressure and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. All subjects completed secondary measures of pulmonary function, the six-minute walk test, the timed stair climb, the Multiple Sclerosis Self-Efficacy Scale, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, and the Physical Activity Disability Scale. RESULTS: Maximal inspiratory pressure and expiratory pressure (mean ± SD) increased 35% ± 22% (P<.001) and 26% ± 17% (P<.001), respectively, whereas no changes were noted in the control group (12% ± 23% and -4% ± 17%, respectively). RMT improved fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, P<.029), with no change or worsening in the control group. No changes were noted in the six-minute walk test, stair climb, Multiple Sclerosis Self-Efficacy Scale, or Physical Activity Disability Scale in the RMT group. The control group had decreases in emotional well-being and general health (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey). CONCLUSIONS: A short-duration, combined RMT program improved inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength and reduced fatigue in patients with mild to moderate MS. SN - 1532-821X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23714277/A_combined_inspiratory_and_expiratory_muscle_training_program_improves_respiratory_muscle_strength_and_fatigue_in_multiple_sclerosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0003-9993(13)00400-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -