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Outcomes of medical emergencies on commercial airline flights.
N Engl J Med. 2013 May 30; 368(22):2075-83.NEJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Worldwide, 2.75 billion passengers fly on commercial airlines annually. When in-flight medical emergencies occur, access to care is limited. We describe in-flight medical emergencies and the outcomes of these events.

METHODS

We reviewed records of in-flight medical emergency calls from five domestic and international airlines to a physician-directed medical communications center from January 1, 2008, through October 31, 2010. We characterized the most common medical problems and the type of on-board assistance rendered. We determined the incidence of and factors associated with unscheduled aircraft diversion, transport to a hospital, and hospital admission, and we determined the incidence of death.

RESULTS

There were 11,920 in-flight medical emergencies resulting in calls to the center (1 medical emergency per 604 flights). The most common problems were syncope or presyncope (37.4% of cases), respiratory symptoms (12.1%), and nausea or vomiting (9.5%). Physician passengers provided medical assistance in 48.1% of in-flight medical emergencies, and aircraft diversion occurred in 7.3%. Of 10,914 patients for whom postflight follow-up data were available, 25.8% were transported to a hospital by emergency-medical-service personnel, 8.6% were admitted, and 0.3% died. The most common triggers for admission were possible stroke (odds ratio, 3.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.88 to 6.03), respiratory symptoms (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.48 to 3.06), and cardiac symptoms (odds ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.77).

CONCLUSIONS

Most in-flight medical emergencies were related to syncope, respiratory symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms, and a physician was frequently the responding medical volunteer. Few in-flight medical emergencies resulted in diversion of aircraft or death; one fourth of passengers who had an in-flight medical emergency underwent additional evaluation in a hospital. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23718164

Citation

Peterson, Drew C., et al. "Outcomes of Medical Emergencies On Commercial Airline Flights." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 368, no. 22, 2013, pp. 2075-83.
Peterson DC, Martin-Gill C, Guyette FX, et al. Outcomes of medical emergencies on commercial airline flights. N Engl J Med. 2013;368(22):2075-83.
Peterson, D. C., Martin-Gill, C., Guyette, F. X., Tobias, A. Z., McCarthy, C. E., Harrington, S. T., Delbridge, T. R., & Yealy, D. M. (2013). Outcomes of medical emergencies on commercial airline flights. The New England Journal of Medicine, 368(22), 2075-83. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1212052
Peterson DC, et al. Outcomes of Medical Emergencies On Commercial Airline Flights. N Engl J Med. 2013 May 30;368(22):2075-83. PubMed PMID: 23718164.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outcomes of medical emergencies on commercial airline flights. AU - Peterson,Drew C, AU - Martin-Gill,Christian, AU - Guyette,Francis X, AU - Tobias,Adam Z, AU - McCarthy,Catherine E, AU - Harrington,Scott T, AU - Delbridge,Theodore R, AU - Yealy,Donald M, PY - 2013/5/31/entrez PY - 2013/5/31/pubmed PY - 2013/6/7/medline SP - 2075 EP - 83 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N. Engl. J. Med. VL - 368 IS - 22 N2 - BACKGROUND: Worldwide, 2.75 billion passengers fly on commercial airlines annually. When in-flight medical emergencies occur, access to care is limited. We describe in-flight medical emergencies and the outcomes of these events. METHODS: We reviewed records of in-flight medical emergency calls from five domestic and international airlines to a physician-directed medical communications center from January 1, 2008, through October 31, 2010. We characterized the most common medical problems and the type of on-board assistance rendered. We determined the incidence of and factors associated with unscheduled aircraft diversion, transport to a hospital, and hospital admission, and we determined the incidence of death. RESULTS: There were 11,920 in-flight medical emergencies resulting in calls to the center (1 medical emergency per 604 flights). The most common problems were syncope or presyncope (37.4% of cases), respiratory symptoms (12.1%), and nausea or vomiting (9.5%). Physician passengers provided medical assistance in 48.1% of in-flight medical emergencies, and aircraft diversion occurred in 7.3%. Of 10,914 patients for whom postflight follow-up data were available, 25.8% were transported to a hospital by emergency-medical-service personnel, 8.6% were admitted, and 0.3% died. The most common triggers for admission were possible stroke (odds ratio, 3.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.88 to 6.03), respiratory symptoms (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.48 to 3.06), and cardiac symptoms (odds ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.77). CONCLUSIONS: Most in-flight medical emergencies were related to syncope, respiratory symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms, and a physician was frequently the responding medical volunteer. Few in-flight medical emergencies resulted in diversion of aircraft or death; one fourth of passengers who had an in-flight medical emergency underwent additional evaluation in a hospital. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.). SN - 1533-4406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23718164/full_citation L2 - http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1212052?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -