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Socio-economic differences in food group and nutrient intakes among young women in Ireland.
Br J Nutr. 2013 Dec 14; 110(11):2084-97.BJ

Abstract

The present study aimed to investigate socio-economic disparities in food and nutrient intakes among young Irish women. A total of 221 disadvantaged and seventy-four non-disadvantaged women aged 18-35 years were recruited. Diet was assessed using a diet history protocol. Of the total population, 153 disadvantaged and sixty-three non-disadvantaged women were classified as plausible dietary reporters. Food group intakes, nutrient intakes and dietary vitamin and mineral concentrations per MJ of energy consumed were compared between the disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged populations, as was compliance with dietary fibre, macronutrient and micronutrient intake guidelines. The disadvantaged women had lower intakes than the non-disadvantaged women of fruit, vegetables, fish, breakfast cereals, low-fat milk and wholemeal bread (all P< 0·001), yogurt (P= 0·001), low-fat spread (P= 0·002) and fresh meat (P= 0·003). They also had higher intakes of butter, processed red meats, white bread, sugar-sweetened beverages, fried potatoes and potato-based snacks (all P< 0·001) and full-fat milk (P= 0·014). Nutritionally, the disadvantaged women had higher fat, saturated fat and refined sugar intakes; lower dietary fibre, vitamin and mineral intakes; and lower dietary vitamin and mineral densities per MJ than their more advantaged peers. Non-achievement of carbohydrate (P= 0·017), fat (P< 0·001), saturated fat (P< 0·001), refined sugar (P< 0·001), folate (P= 0·050), vitamin C (P< 0·001), vitamin D (P= 0·047) and Ca (P= 0·019) recommendations was more prevalent among the disadvantaged women. Both groups showed poor compliance with Fe and Na guidelines. We conclude that the nutritional deficits present among these socially disadvantaged women are significant, but may be potentially ameliorated by targeted food-based interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Biological Sciences, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Republic of Ireland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23721781

Citation

McCartney, Daniel M A., et al. "Socio-economic Differences in Food Group and Nutrient Intakes Among Young Women in Ireland." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 110, no. 11, 2013, pp. 2084-97.
McCartney DM, Younger KM, Walsh J, et al. Socio-economic differences in food group and nutrient intakes among young women in Ireland. Br J Nutr. 2013;110(11):2084-97.
McCartney, D. M., Younger, K. M., Walsh, J., O'Neill, M., Sheridan, C., & Kearney, J. M. (2013). Socio-economic differences in food group and nutrient intakes among young women in Ireland. The British Journal of Nutrition, 110(11), 2084-97. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114513001463
McCartney DM, et al. Socio-economic Differences in Food Group and Nutrient Intakes Among Young Women in Ireland. Br J Nutr. 2013 Dec 14;110(11):2084-97. PubMed PMID: 23721781.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Socio-economic differences in food group and nutrient intakes among young women in Ireland. AU - McCartney,Daniel M A, AU - Younger,Katherine M, AU - Walsh,Joanne, AU - O'Neill,Marie, AU - Sheridan,Claire, AU - Kearney,John M, Y1 - 2013/05/31/ PY - 2013/6/1/entrez PY - 2013/6/1/pubmed PY - 2014/1/28/medline SP - 2084 EP - 97 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 110 IS - 11 N2 - The present study aimed to investigate socio-economic disparities in food and nutrient intakes among young Irish women. A total of 221 disadvantaged and seventy-four non-disadvantaged women aged 18-35 years were recruited. Diet was assessed using a diet history protocol. Of the total population, 153 disadvantaged and sixty-three non-disadvantaged women were classified as plausible dietary reporters. Food group intakes, nutrient intakes and dietary vitamin and mineral concentrations per MJ of energy consumed were compared between the disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged populations, as was compliance with dietary fibre, macronutrient and micronutrient intake guidelines. The disadvantaged women had lower intakes than the non-disadvantaged women of fruit, vegetables, fish, breakfast cereals, low-fat milk and wholemeal bread (all P< 0·001), yogurt (P= 0·001), low-fat spread (P= 0·002) and fresh meat (P= 0·003). They also had higher intakes of butter, processed red meats, white bread, sugar-sweetened beverages, fried potatoes and potato-based snacks (all P< 0·001) and full-fat milk (P= 0·014). Nutritionally, the disadvantaged women had higher fat, saturated fat and refined sugar intakes; lower dietary fibre, vitamin and mineral intakes; and lower dietary vitamin and mineral densities per MJ than their more advantaged peers. Non-achievement of carbohydrate (P= 0·017), fat (P< 0·001), saturated fat (P< 0·001), refined sugar (P< 0·001), folate (P= 0·050), vitamin C (P< 0·001), vitamin D (P= 0·047) and Ca (P= 0·019) recommendations was more prevalent among the disadvantaged women. Both groups showed poor compliance with Fe and Na guidelines. We conclude that the nutritional deficits present among these socially disadvantaged women are significant, but may be potentially ameliorated by targeted food-based interventions. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23721781/Socio_economic_differences_in_food_group_and_nutrient_intakes_among_young_women_in_Ireland_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114513001463/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -