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Dogs show left facial lateralization upon reunion with their owners.
Behav Processes. 2013 Sep; 98:112-6.BP

Abstract

Domestic dogs demonstrate behavioral laterality in response to emotional stimuli; those responses include tail wagging and head turning. The dog is the species with the closest relationship to humans; dogs can express strong social emotions (e.g., attachment and separation anxiety) to specific persons, such as their owners. In this study, we examined whether dogs demonstrate more facial laterality when reunited with their owners than when they encounter an unfamiliar person in an unfamiliar situation. We also examined whether the observed laterality was specific to positive social stimuli (i.e., the owner) or a general response to nonsocial positive stimuli (i.e., toys). The dogs' facial expressions were recorded by a high-speed video camera during the presentation of emotional stimuli and the acceleration rates of parts of their faces were analyzed. The results showed that the left eyebrow moved more when the owner was present than at baseline. No bias in terms of eyebrow movement was observed when the dogs saw attractive toys. These results suggest that dogs show facial laterality in response to emotional stimuli. This laterality was specific to social stimuli, probably reflecting the dog's attachment to the owner.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Chuoh-ku, Sagamihara, 252-5201 Kanagawa-ken, Japan. nagasawa@carazabu.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23727034

Citation

Nagasawa, Miho, et al. "Dogs Show Left Facial Lateralization Upon Reunion With Their Owners." Behavioural Processes, vol. 98, 2013, pp. 112-6.
Nagasawa M, Kawai E, Mogi K, et al. Dogs show left facial lateralization upon reunion with their owners. Behav Processes. 2013;98:112-6.
Nagasawa, M., Kawai, E., Mogi, K., & Kikusui, T. (2013). Dogs show left facial lateralization upon reunion with their owners. Behavioural Processes, 98, 112-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beproc.2013.05.012
Nagasawa M, et al. Dogs Show Left Facial Lateralization Upon Reunion With Their Owners. Behav Processes. 2013;98:112-6. PubMed PMID: 23727034.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dogs show left facial lateralization upon reunion with their owners. AU - Nagasawa,Miho, AU - Kawai,Emi, AU - Mogi,Kazutaka, AU - Kikusui,Takefumi, Y1 - 2013/05/30/ PY - 2012/07/30/received PY - 2013/04/29/revised PY - 2013/05/15/accepted PY - 2013/6/4/entrez PY - 2013/6/4/pubmed PY - 2014/5/16/medline KW - Acceleration rate KW - Attachment KW - Dog KW - Emotional stimuli KW - Facial lateralization SP - 112 EP - 6 JF - Behavioural processes JO - Behav Processes VL - 98 N2 - Domestic dogs demonstrate behavioral laterality in response to emotional stimuli; those responses include tail wagging and head turning. The dog is the species with the closest relationship to humans; dogs can express strong social emotions (e.g., attachment and separation anxiety) to specific persons, such as their owners. In this study, we examined whether dogs demonstrate more facial laterality when reunited with their owners than when they encounter an unfamiliar person in an unfamiliar situation. We also examined whether the observed laterality was specific to positive social stimuli (i.e., the owner) or a general response to nonsocial positive stimuli (i.e., toys). The dogs' facial expressions were recorded by a high-speed video camera during the presentation of emotional stimuli and the acceleration rates of parts of their faces were analyzed. The results showed that the left eyebrow moved more when the owner was present than at baseline. No bias in terms of eyebrow movement was observed when the dogs saw attractive toys. These results suggest that dogs show facial laterality in response to emotional stimuli. This laterality was specific to social stimuli, probably reflecting the dog's attachment to the owner. SN - 1872-8308 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23727034/Dogs_show_left_facial_lateralization_upon_reunion_with_their_owners_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-6357(13)00110-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -