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Neighborhood safety and green space as predictors of obesity among preschool children from low-income families in New York City.
Prev Med 2013; 57(3):189-93PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Neighborhood safety, green space, walkability, and sociodemographics may influence physical activity and childhood obesity.

METHODS

Data on measured height and weight, demographic characteristics, and home ZIP code were collected from year 2004 enrollees in a means-tested preschool program in New York City. Each ZIP code was surrounded by a 400-m buffer and characterized using data from the US census, local government departments, New York Times website, and Transportation Alternatives. Linear and Poisson models were constructed using cluster robust standard errors and adjusting for child's sex, race, ethnicity, age, and neighborhood characteristics.

RESULTS

Analyses included 11,562 children ages 3-5 years living in 160 residential ZIP codes. A higher homicide rate (at the 75th vs 25th percentile) was associated with a 22% higher prevalence of obesity (95% CI for the prevalence ratio (PR): 1.05 to 1.41). A higher density of street trees (at the 75th vs 25th percentile) was associated with 12% lower prevalence of obesity (95% CI for the PR: 0.79 to 0.99). Other neighborhood characteristics did not have significant associations with childhood obesity.

CONCLUSIONS

Among preschool children from low-income families, neighborhood homicide rate was associated with more obesity and street tree density was associated with less obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, New York, NY, USA. glovasi@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23732240

Citation

Lovasi, Gina S., et al. "Neighborhood Safety and Green Space as Predictors of Obesity Among Preschool Children From Low-income Families in New York City." Preventive Medicine, vol. 57, no. 3, 2013, pp. 189-93.
Lovasi GS, Schwartz-Soicher O, Quinn JW, et al. Neighborhood safety and green space as predictors of obesity among preschool children from low-income families in New York City. Prev Med. 2013;57(3):189-93.
Lovasi, G. S., Schwartz-Soicher, O., Quinn, J. W., Berger, D. K., Neckerman, K. M., Jaslow, R., ... Rundle, A. (2013). Neighborhood safety and green space as predictors of obesity among preschool children from low-income families in New York City. Preventive Medicine, 57(3), pp. 189-93. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.05.012.
Lovasi GS, et al. Neighborhood Safety and Green Space as Predictors of Obesity Among Preschool Children From Low-income Families in New York City. Prev Med. 2013;57(3):189-93. PubMed PMID: 23732240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neighborhood safety and green space as predictors of obesity among preschool children from low-income families in New York City. AU - Lovasi,Gina S, AU - Schwartz-Soicher,Ofira, AU - Quinn,James W, AU - Berger,Diana K, AU - Neckerman,Kathryn M, AU - Jaslow,Risa, AU - Lee,Karen K, AU - Rundle,Andrew, Y1 - 2013/05/31/ PY - 2012/12/27/received PY - 2013/05/15/revised PY - 2013/05/26/accepted PY - 2013/6/5/entrez PY - 2013/6/5/pubmed PY - 2014/4/25/medline KW - Adiposity KW - BMI KW - Child KW - Environment KW - GIS KW - GPS KW - Geographic Information Systems KW - Global Positioning Systems KW - NYC KW - New York City KW - Obesity KW - PLUTO KW - Poverty KW - Preschool KW - Primary Land Use Tax Lot Output KW - Residence Characteristics KW - Safety KW - Urban Population KW - body mass index (weight (kg)/height(m)(2)) SP - 189 EP - 93 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 57 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Neighborhood safety, green space, walkability, and sociodemographics may influence physical activity and childhood obesity. METHODS: Data on measured height and weight, demographic characteristics, and home ZIP code were collected from year 2004 enrollees in a means-tested preschool program in New York City. Each ZIP code was surrounded by a 400-m buffer and characterized using data from the US census, local government departments, New York Times website, and Transportation Alternatives. Linear and Poisson models were constructed using cluster robust standard errors and adjusting for child's sex, race, ethnicity, age, and neighborhood characteristics. RESULTS: Analyses included 11,562 children ages 3-5 years living in 160 residential ZIP codes. A higher homicide rate (at the 75th vs 25th percentile) was associated with a 22% higher prevalence of obesity (95% CI for the prevalence ratio (PR): 1.05 to 1.41). A higher density of street trees (at the 75th vs 25th percentile) was associated with 12% lower prevalence of obesity (95% CI for the PR: 0.79 to 0.99). Other neighborhood characteristics did not have significant associations with childhood obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Among preschool children from low-income families, neighborhood homicide rate was associated with more obesity and street tree density was associated with less obesity. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23732240/Neighborhood_safety_and_green_space_as_predictors_of_obesity_among_preschool_children_from_low_income_families_in_New_York_City_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(13)00175-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -