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Plasma homocysteine and folate levels and dietary folate intake in adolescents and young adults who underwent kidney transplantation during childhood.
Clin Exp Nephrol. 2014 Feb; 18(1):151-6.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hyperhomocysteinemia (hyper-Hcy) is an important and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factor. We examined the prevalence of hyper-Hcy, plasma folate levels, and dietary folate intake in adolescents and young adults who had undergone kidney transplantation during childhood to assess the necessity for managing dietary folate.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study was performed in 89 kidney transplant recipients (age at kidney transplantation: 12.6 ± 4.1 years; age during study: 21.2 ± 5.5 years). Hyper-Hcy and plasma folate deficiency were defined as plasma homocysteine (Hcy) >15 nmol/ml and plasma folate <3.0 ng/ml, respectively.

RESULTS

Of the patients, 60 (67.4 %) had hyper-Hcy and 14 (15.7 %) had plasma folate deficiency. Plasma homocysteine levels correlated negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; r = -0.565, p < 0.01) and plasma folate levels (r = -0.434, p < 0.01). For determinants of plasma homocysteine levels, a priori selected variables included kind of calcineurin inhibitor, age at kidney transplantation, pretransplant duration of dialysis, time since transplantation, age at examination, eGFR, and plasma folate. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed eGFR and plasma folate levels as significant independent variables influencing plasma homocysteine levels. Dietary folate intake in 11 of 16 patients (66.8 %) with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) was below the recommended dietary allowance for Japanese.

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence of hyper-Hcy and plasma folate deficiency, as well as the low dietary folate intake, suggest that dietary management of folate is necessary for adolescents and young adults who have undergone kidney transplantation during childhood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Nephrology, School of Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 162-8666, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23732398

Citation

Hamatani, Ryoko, et al. "Plasma Homocysteine and Folate Levels and Dietary Folate Intake in Adolescents and Young Adults Who Underwent Kidney Transplantation During Childhood." Clinical and Experimental Nephrology, vol. 18, no. 1, 2014, pp. 151-6.
Hamatani R, Otsu M, Chikamoto H, et al. Plasma homocysteine and folate levels and dietary folate intake in adolescents and young adults who underwent kidney transplantation during childhood. Clin Exp Nephrol. 2014;18(1):151-6.
Hamatani, R., Otsu, M., Chikamoto, H., Akioka, Y., & Hattori, M. (2014). Plasma homocysteine and folate levels and dietary folate intake in adolescents and young adults who underwent kidney transplantation during childhood. Clinical and Experimental Nephrology, 18(1), 151-6. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10157-013-0819-3
Hamatani R, et al. Plasma Homocysteine and Folate Levels and Dietary Folate Intake in Adolescents and Young Adults Who Underwent Kidney Transplantation During Childhood. Clin Exp Nephrol. 2014;18(1):151-6. PubMed PMID: 23732398.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma homocysteine and folate levels and dietary folate intake in adolescents and young adults who underwent kidney transplantation during childhood. AU - Hamatani,Ryoko, AU - Otsu,Miki, AU - Chikamoto,Hiroko, AU - Akioka,Yuko, AU - Hattori,Motoshi, Y1 - 2013/06/04/ PY - 2013/01/25/received PY - 2013/05/09/accepted PY - 2013/6/5/entrez PY - 2013/6/5/pubmed PY - 2016/5/10/medline SP - 151 EP - 6 JF - Clinical and experimental nephrology JO - Clin Exp Nephrol VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hyperhomocysteinemia (hyper-Hcy) is an important and reversible cardiovascular disease risk factor. We examined the prevalence of hyper-Hcy, plasma folate levels, and dietary folate intake in adolescents and young adults who had undergone kidney transplantation during childhood to assess the necessity for managing dietary folate. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was performed in 89 kidney transplant recipients (age at kidney transplantation: 12.6 ± 4.1 years; age during study: 21.2 ± 5.5 years). Hyper-Hcy and plasma folate deficiency were defined as plasma homocysteine (Hcy) >15 nmol/ml and plasma folate <3.0 ng/ml, respectively. RESULTS: Of the patients, 60 (67.4 %) had hyper-Hcy and 14 (15.7 %) had plasma folate deficiency. Plasma homocysteine levels correlated negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; r = -0.565, p < 0.01) and plasma folate levels (r = -0.434, p < 0.01). For determinants of plasma homocysteine levels, a priori selected variables included kind of calcineurin inhibitor, age at kidney transplantation, pretransplant duration of dialysis, time since transplantation, age at examination, eGFR, and plasma folate. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed eGFR and plasma folate levels as significant independent variables influencing plasma homocysteine levels. Dietary folate intake in 11 of 16 patients (66.8 %) with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) was below the recommended dietary allowance for Japanese. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hyper-Hcy and plasma folate deficiency, as well as the low dietary folate intake, suggest that dietary management of folate is necessary for adolescents and young adults who have undergone kidney transplantation during childhood. SN - 1437-7799 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23732398/Plasma_homocysteine_and_folate_levels_and_dietary_folate_intake_in_adolescents_and_young_adults_who_underwent_kidney_transplantation_during_childhood_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10157-013-0819-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -