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Pneumococcal bacterial load colonization as a marker of mixed infection in children with alveolar community-acquired pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus or rhinovirus infection.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Nov; 32(11):1199-204.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The main aim of this study was to evaluate whether nasopharyngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in children with alveolar community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or rhinovirus (RV) infection indicates a mixed lung infection.

METHODS

The nasopharyngeal secretions of 530 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were tested using the Luminex x TAG respiratory virus panel fast assay. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the autolysin-A (LytA) and wzg (cpsA) genes of S. pneumoniae was performed on the RSV- and RV-positive samples.

RESULTS

Sixty-five of the 126 RSV-positive children (51.6%) were colonized with S. pneumoniae. Mean bacterial load was significantly higher in the patients with alveolar involvement (4.54±1.47 log10 DNA copies/mL vs. 3.75±1.62 log10 DNA copies/mL; P=0.04). Serotypes 5 and 19A were almost exclusively identified in the children with RSV and alveolar CAP, although the difference was statistically significant only for serotype 19A (P=0.03). Eighty-three of the 134 RV-positive children (61.9%) were colonized with S. pneumoniae and again mean bacterial load was significantly higher in the patients with alveolar involvement (4.21±1.37 log10 DNA copies/mL vs. 3.41±1.47 log10 DNA copies/mL; P=0.03). Serotypes 1, 5 and 19A were more frequently identified in the children with RV and alveolar CAP, although the difference was statistically significant only for serotype 5 (P=0.04).

CONCLUSIONS

In children with alveolar CAP and RSV or RV infection, the determination of nasopharyngeal pneumococcal bacterial load and identification of the serotypes can contribute to the diagnosis of mixed lung infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the *Pediatric Clinic 1, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico; and †Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche "Mario Negri"-IRCCS, Milan, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23743541

Citation

Esposito, Susanna, et al. "Pneumococcal Bacterial Load Colonization as a Marker of Mixed Infection in Children With Alveolar Community-acquired Pneumonia and Respiratory Syncytial Virus or Rhinovirus Infection." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 32, no. 11, 2013, pp. 1199-204.
Esposito S, Zampiero A, Terranova L, et al. Pneumococcal bacterial load colonization as a marker of mixed infection in children with alveolar community-acquired pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus or rhinovirus infection. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(11):1199-204.
Esposito, S., Zampiero, A., Terranova, L., Ierardi, V., Ascolese, B., Daleno, C., Prada, E., Pelucchi, C., & Principi, N. (2013). Pneumococcal bacterial load colonization as a marker of mixed infection in children with alveolar community-acquired pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus or rhinovirus infection. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 32(11), 1199-204. https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e31829ec274
Esposito S, et al. Pneumococcal Bacterial Load Colonization as a Marker of Mixed Infection in Children With Alveolar Community-acquired Pneumonia and Respiratory Syncytial Virus or Rhinovirus Infection. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(11):1199-204. PubMed PMID: 23743541.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pneumococcal bacterial load colonization as a marker of mixed infection in children with alveolar community-acquired pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus or rhinovirus infection. AU - Esposito,Susanna, AU - Zampiero,Alberto, AU - Terranova,Leonardo, AU - Ierardi,Valentina, AU - Ascolese,Beatrice, AU - Daleno,Cristina, AU - Prada,Elisabetta, AU - Pelucchi,Claudio, AU - Principi,Nicola, PY - 2013/6/8/entrez PY - 2013/6/8/pubmed PY - 2014/6/15/medline SP - 1199 EP - 204 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 32 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The main aim of this study was to evaluate whether nasopharyngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in children with alveolar community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or rhinovirus (RV) infection indicates a mixed lung infection. METHODS: The nasopharyngeal secretions of 530 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were tested using the Luminex x TAG respiratory virus panel fast assay. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the autolysin-A (LytA) and wzg (cpsA) genes of S. pneumoniae was performed on the RSV- and RV-positive samples. RESULTS: Sixty-five of the 126 RSV-positive children (51.6%) were colonized with S. pneumoniae. Mean bacterial load was significantly higher in the patients with alveolar involvement (4.54±1.47 log10 DNA copies/mL vs. 3.75±1.62 log10 DNA copies/mL; P=0.04). Serotypes 5 and 19A were almost exclusively identified in the children with RSV and alveolar CAP, although the difference was statistically significant only for serotype 19A (P=0.03). Eighty-three of the 134 RV-positive children (61.9%) were colonized with S. pneumoniae and again mean bacterial load was significantly higher in the patients with alveolar involvement (4.21±1.37 log10 DNA copies/mL vs. 3.41±1.47 log10 DNA copies/mL; P=0.03). Serotypes 1, 5 and 19A were more frequently identified in the children with RV and alveolar CAP, although the difference was statistically significant only for serotype 5 (P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: In children with alveolar CAP and RSV or RV infection, the determination of nasopharyngeal pneumococcal bacterial load and identification of the serotypes can contribute to the diagnosis of mixed lung infection. SN - 1532-0987 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23743541/Pneumococcal_bacterial_load_colonization_as_a_marker_of_mixed_infection_in_children_with_alveolar_community_acquired_pneumonia_and_respiratory_syncytial_virus_or_rhinovirus_infection_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e31829ec274 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -