Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hours of work and rest in the rail industry.
Intern Med J. 2013 Jun; 43(6):717-21.IM

Abstract

Currently, the National Transport Commission is considering four options to form the regulatory framework for rail safety within Australia with respect to fatigue. While the National Transport Commission currently recommends no limitations around hours of work or rest, we provide evidence which suggests regulatory frameworks should incorporate a traditional hours of service regulation over more flexible policies. Our review highlights: Shift durations >12 h are associated with a doubling of risk for accident and injury. Fatigue builds cumulatively with each successive shift where rest in between is inadequate (<12 h). A regulatory framework for fatigue management within the rail industry should prescribe limits on hours of work and rest, including maximum shift duration and successive number of shifts. Appropriately, validated biomathematical models and technologies may be used as a part of a fatigue management system, to augment the protection afforded by limits on hours of work and rest. A comprehensive sleep disorder screening and management programme should form an essential component of any regulatory framework.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. clare.anderson@monash.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23745994

Citation

Anderson, C, et al. "Hours of Work and Rest in the Rail Industry." Internal Medicine Journal, vol. 43, no. 6, 2013, pp. 717-21.
Anderson C, Grunstein RR, Rajaratnam SM. Hours of work and rest in the rail industry. Intern Med J. 2013;43(6):717-21.
Anderson, C., Grunstein, R. R., & Rajaratnam, S. M. (2013). Hours of work and rest in the rail industry. Internal Medicine Journal, 43(6), 717-21. https://doi.org/10.1111/imj.12159
Anderson C, Grunstein RR, Rajaratnam SM. Hours of Work and Rest in the Rail Industry. Intern Med J. 2013;43(6):717-21. PubMed PMID: 23745994.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hours of work and rest in the rail industry. AU - Anderson,C, AU - Grunstein,R R, AU - Rajaratnam,S M W, PY - 2012/06/21/received PY - 2012/08/18/accepted PY - 2013/6/11/entrez PY - 2013/6/12/pubmed PY - 2014/2/15/medline SP - 717 EP - 21 JF - Internal medicine journal JO - Intern Med J VL - 43 IS - 6 N2 - Currently, the National Transport Commission is considering four options to form the regulatory framework for rail safety within Australia with respect to fatigue. While the National Transport Commission currently recommends no limitations around hours of work or rest, we provide evidence which suggests regulatory frameworks should incorporate a traditional hours of service regulation over more flexible policies. Our review highlights: Shift durations >12 h are associated with a doubling of risk for accident and injury. Fatigue builds cumulatively with each successive shift where rest in between is inadequate (<12 h). A regulatory framework for fatigue management within the rail industry should prescribe limits on hours of work and rest, including maximum shift duration and successive number of shifts. Appropriately, validated biomathematical models and technologies may be used as a part of a fatigue management system, to augment the protection afforded by limits on hours of work and rest. A comprehensive sleep disorder screening and management programme should form an essential component of any regulatory framework. SN - 1445-5994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23745994/Hours_of_work_and_rest_in_the_rail_industry_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/imj.12159 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -