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Estimation of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intakes in pregnant Japanese women without nausea by using a self-administered diet history questionnaire.
Nutr Res 2013; 33(6):473-8NR

Abstract

Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intakes during pregnancy affect fetal development and maternal mental health; therefore, an accurate assessment of EPA and DHA intakes is required. We hypothesized that a self-administered diet history questionnaire (DHQ) that was developed for non-pregnant adults could be used for estimating EPA and DHA intakes in pregnant Japanese women; thus, we evaluated the validity and reproducibility of the DHQ during pregnancy. We recruited 262 healthy participants with singleton pregnancies during their second trimester at a university hospital in Tokyo between June 2010 and July 2011. Plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA were measured as reference values. Fifty-eight women completed the DHQ twice, within a 4- to 5-week period to assess the reproducibility of the results. Among the participants without pregnancy-associated nausea (n = 180), significantly positive correlations were observed between energy-adjusted intakes and plasma concentrations of EPA (r(s) = 0.388), DHA (r(s) = 0.264), and EPA + DHA (r(s) = 0.328). More than 60% of the participants without nausea fell into the same or adjacent quintiles according to energy-adjusted intakes and plasma concentrations of EPA, DHA, and EPA + DHA. Meanwhile, among the participants with nausea, a low correlation for EPA and no correlation for DHA and EPA + DHA were found. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the 2-time DHQ measurements were 0.691 (EPA) and 0.663 (DHA). The results indicate that the DHQ has an acceptable level of validity and reproducibility for assessing EPA, DHA, and EPA + DHA intakes in pregnant Japanese women without nausea.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Health Sciences and Nursing, Department of Midwifery and Women's Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. mi-shi@umin.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23746563

Citation

Shiraishi, Mie, et al. "Estimation of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Intakes in Pregnant Japanese Women Without Nausea By Using a Self-administered Diet History Questionnaire." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 33, no. 6, 2013, pp. 473-8.
Shiraishi M, Haruna M, Matsuzaki M, et al. Estimation of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intakes in pregnant Japanese women without nausea by using a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Nutr Res. 2013;33(6):473-8.
Shiraishi, M., Haruna, M., Matsuzaki, M., Murayama, R., Yatsuki, Y., & Sasaki, S. (2013). Estimation of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intakes in pregnant Japanese women without nausea by using a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 33(6), pp. 473-8. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2013.04.002.
Shiraishi M, et al. Estimation of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Intakes in Pregnant Japanese Women Without Nausea By Using a Self-administered Diet History Questionnaire. Nutr Res. 2013;33(6):473-8. PubMed PMID: 23746563.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Estimation of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intakes in pregnant Japanese women without nausea by using a self-administered diet history questionnaire. AU - Shiraishi,Mie, AU - Haruna,Megumi, AU - Matsuzaki,Masayo, AU - Murayama,Ryoko, AU - Yatsuki,Yuko, AU - Sasaki,Satoshi, Y1 - 2013/05/07/ PY - 2012/08/15/received PY - 2013/03/30/revised PY - 2013/04/02/accepted PY - 2013/6/11/entrez PY - 2013/6/12/pubmed PY - 2014/1/31/medline SP - 473 EP - 8 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 33 IS - 6 N2 - Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intakes during pregnancy affect fetal development and maternal mental health; therefore, an accurate assessment of EPA and DHA intakes is required. We hypothesized that a self-administered diet history questionnaire (DHQ) that was developed for non-pregnant adults could be used for estimating EPA and DHA intakes in pregnant Japanese women; thus, we evaluated the validity and reproducibility of the DHQ during pregnancy. We recruited 262 healthy participants with singleton pregnancies during their second trimester at a university hospital in Tokyo between June 2010 and July 2011. Plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA were measured as reference values. Fifty-eight women completed the DHQ twice, within a 4- to 5-week period to assess the reproducibility of the results. Among the participants without pregnancy-associated nausea (n = 180), significantly positive correlations were observed between energy-adjusted intakes and plasma concentrations of EPA (r(s) = 0.388), DHA (r(s) = 0.264), and EPA + DHA (r(s) = 0.328). More than 60% of the participants without nausea fell into the same or adjacent quintiles according to energy-adjusted intakes and plasma concentrations of EPA, DHA, and EPA + DHA. Meanwhile, among the participants with nausea, a low correlation for EPA and no correlation for DHA and EPA + DHA were found. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the 2-time DHQ measurements were 0.691 (EPA) and 0.663 (DHA). The results indicate that the DHQ has an acceptable level of validity and reproducibility for assessing EPA, DHA, and EPA + DHA intakes in pregnant Japanese women without nausea. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23746563/Estimation_of_eicosapentaenoic_acid_and_docosahexaenoic_acid_intakes_in_pregnant_Japanese_women_without_nausea_by_using_a_self_administered_diet_history_questionnaire_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(13)00075-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -