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Linguistic acculturation and skin cancer-related behaviors among Hispanics in the southern and western United States.
JAMA Dermatol 2013; 149(6):679-86JD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between linguistic acculturation (assessed using the Language Use and Linguistic Preference subscales from the Bidimensional Acculturation Scale for Hispanics) and skin cancer-related behaviors among US Hispanic adults to determine whether, compared with Hispanics denoted as Spanish-acculturated, English-acculturated Hispanics would report less frequent shade seeking and use of sun protective clothing and higher rates of sunscreen use, sunbathing, and indoor tanning.

DESIGN

Online survey study conducted in September 2011.

SETTING

Five southern and western US states.

PARTICIPANTS

A population-based sample of 788 Hispanic adults drawn from a nationally representative web panel.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Self-reported sunscreen use, shade seeking, use of sun protective clothing, sunbathing, and indoor tanning.

RESULTS

Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to examine predictors of the skin cancer-related behaviors. As hypothesized, English-acculturated Hispanics had lower rates of shade seeking and use of sun protective clothing and reported higher rates of sunbathing and indoor tanning than Spanish-acculturated Hispanics. English-acculturated Hispanics and bicultural Hispanics (ie, those with high Spanish and high English acculturation) reported comparably high rates of sunbathing and indoor tanning. Results suggested that bicultural Hispanics seek shade and wear sun protective clothing less often than Spanish-acculturated Hispanics but more often than English-acculturated Hispanics. Acculturation was not associated with sunscreen use.

CONCLUSIONS

Hispanic adults do not routinely engage in behaviors that reduce their risk of skin cancer. Bicultural and English-acculturated Hispanics are particularly in need of skin cancer prevention interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany St, Room 5567, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. coupsej@umdnj.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23752366

Citation

Coups, Elliot J., et al. "Linguistic Acculturation and Skin Cancer-related Behaviors Among Hispanics in the Southern and Western United States." JAMA Dermatology, vol. 149, no. 6, 2013, pp. 679-86.
Coups EJ, Stapleton JL, Hudson SV, et al. Linguistic acculturation and skin cancer-related behaviors among Hispanics in the southern and western United States. JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(6):679-86.
Coups, E. J., Stapleton, J. L., Hudson, S. V., Medina-Forrester, A., Rosenberg, S. A., Gordon, M. A., ... Goydos, J. S. (2013). Linguistic acculturation and skin cancer-related behaviors among Hispanics in the southern and western United States. JAMA Dermatology, 149(6), pp. 679-86. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.745.
Coups EJ, et al. Linguistic Acculturation and Skin Cancer-related Behaviors Among Hispanics in the Southern and Western United States. JAMA Dermatol. 2013;149(6):679-86. PubMed PMID: 23752366.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Linguistic acculturation and skin cancer-related behaviors among Hispanics in the southern and western United States. AU - Coups,Elliot J, AU - Stapleton,Jerod L, AU - Hudson,Shawna V, AU - Medina-Forrester,Amanda, AU - Rosenberg,Stephen A, AU - Gordon,Marsha A, AU - Natale-Pereira,Ana, AU - Goydos,James S, PY - 2013/6/12/entrez PY - 2013/6/12/pubmed PY - 2013/9/3/medline SP - 679 EP - 86 JF - JAMA dermatology JO - JAMA Dermatol VL - 149 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between linguistic acculturation (assessed using the Language Use and Linguistic Preference subscales from the Bidimensional Acculturation Scale for Hispanics) and skin cancer-related behaviors among US Hispanic adults to determine whether, compared with Hispanics denoted as Spanish-acculturated, English-acculturated Hispanics would report less frequent shade seeking and use of sun protective clothing and higher rates of sunscreen use, sunbathing, and indoor tanning. DESIGN: Online survey study conducted in September 2011. SETTING: Five southern and western US states. PARTICIPANTS: A population-based sample of 788 Hispanic adults drawn from a nationally representative web panel. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported sunscreen use, shade seeking, use of sun protective clothing, sunbathing, and indoor tanning. RESULTS: Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to examine predictors of the skin cancer-related behaviors. As hypothesized, English-acculturated Hispanics had lower rates of shade seeking and use of sun protective clothing and reported higher rates of sunbathing and indoor tanning than Spanish-acculturated Hispanics. English-acculturated Hispanics and bicultural Hispanics (ie, those with high Spanish and high English acculturation) reported comparably high rates of sunbathing and indoor tanning. Results suggested that bicultural Hispanics seek shade and wear sun protective clothing less often than Spanish-acculturated Hispanics but more often than English-acculturated Hispanics. Acculturation was not associated with sunscreen use. CONCLUSIONS: Hispanic adults do not routinely engage in behaviors that reduce their risk of skin cancer. Bicultural and English-acculturated Hispanics are particularly in need of skin cancer prevention interventions. SN - 2168-6084 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23752366/Linguistic_acculturation_and_skin_cancer_related_behaviors_among_Hispanics_in_the_southern_and_western_United_States_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.745 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -